• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe the characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Showing how they change as the play progresses. Compare them. Who is the strongest?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Coursework Macbeth and Lady Macbeth Describe the characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Showing how they change as the play progresses. Compare them. Who is the strongest? Macbeth At the beginning of the play, Macbeth is a violent soldier in war but he was famous for his bravery and loyalty. (Act 1 Sc2) He is awarded. 'For brave Macbeth - well he deserves that name' In the next scene Macbeth and banqo meet the three witches and they tell Macbeth three predictions. (Act 1 Scene 3) Macbeth is excited by the witches' words. He wonders whether to act or see if they will come true on they own but when he receives news that he is now 'Thane of Cawdor', he has proof that they know the future and he begins to believe them. He writes a letter to his wife telling her what has happened and begins to think of murdering Duncan (king) so he can be king, like the witches said. ...read more.

Middle

'Hence horrible shadow, unreal mockery, hence!' He decides to return to the witches. The witches lead him to believe he is invulnerable. (Act 4 sc 1) 'The power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth' Macbeth orders murders to kill macduff's family while macduff is in England. This shows me that Macbeth was totally in the witches' power. Lady Macbeth commits suicide in Act 5 scene 5. When he finds out his wife is dead he is very quiet and thoughtful. He realise, he can never return to where he was happy, before he became king. He also realise that the witches have fooled him. Macduff kills Macbeth in battle. This shows Macbeth was a fighter. Macbeth goes from being loyal, honourable soldier and husband to a violent, desperate tyrant. Lady Macbeth We do not see Lady Macbeth until she receives a letter from her husband Macbeth. Lady Macbeth's reaction when she reads it is powerful and dramatic. As soon as she's finished reading, she has decided she will make sure Macbeth is king. ...read more.

Conclusion

Her husband no longer consults her. In Act 5 Scene 1, Lady Macbeth begins to walk and talk in her sleep. The blood of Duncan haunts her. She tries washing the blood off her hands. 'These hands never be clean' Fear and guilt drives her to madness. She relives the night of Duncan's murder again and again. She commits suicide. 'To bed, to bed: there's knocking at the gate. Come, come, come, come, give me your hand. What's done cannot be undone. To bed, to bed, to bed.' At the beginning Lady Macbeth was in control. After killing Duncan Macbeth becomes more violent. As the play progress Macbeth is in control and Lady Macbeth is weak and doesn't know what is happening. Macbeth doesn't tell Lady Macbeth about the murders until it has happened. I think Macbeth is the strongest. He is scared at the beginning but after he murdered Duncan he begin to think that no-one can hurt him. He killed more people while Lady Macbeth was breaking down. He believed what the witches said. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Macbeth essays

  1. How much sympathy do we have for Macbeth as the play progresses?

    The witches appear again in the play when Macbeth seeks them out in Act IV and they give him three new prophecies. These prophecies appeal to Macbeth's train of thought. He feels that he is safe if he acts on his desires, as a wood cannot move and a man has to be born of a woman.

  2. Macbeth and Hamlet : Compare and Contrast

    Note the inward pangs and warnings of conscience interpreted into prudential reasonings. Act ii. sc. i. Banquo's speech: A heavy summons lies like lead upon me, And yet I would not sleep. Merciful powers! Restrain in me the cursed thoughts, that nature Gives way to in repose.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work