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How does Charles Dickens convey the character of scrooge in the early pages of a Christmas Carol?

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Introduction

Christmas Carol How does Charles Dickens convey the character of scrooge in the early pages of a Christmas Carol? Charles Dickens, is best known for his host of distinctively cruel, repugnant characters. His father was sent to a Debtors prison taken his son Charles with him maybe this is where some of the ideas for characters came from. After a few years, Dickens left the prison to work in a blacking factory. Dickens started writing in prosperous Victorian England, where only the rich were cared for. He grew up seeing what the poor people had to experience and how they had to live in this world. The technique the writer uses is of a physical appearance. Describing Scrooge he gives the readers an idea of what he looks like, with no visual images. ...read more.

Middle

This shows that the human race didn't like Scrooge. The author describes Scrooge by putting plenty of feelings into the lines. Dickens describes Scrooge with feeling in the line, "Oh! But he was a tight fisted hand at the grindstone." This suggests that Scrooge makes people work very hard and doesn't give them a lot in return. Another way Dickens uses to dramatise Scrooge's unpleasantness is by showing how the other characters react to him and him to them. If he is asked a question the answer is always No. He never reacts with kindness or politeness to other characters. Scrooge's nephew is one of the few characters who makes an effort to be pleasant to him, but Scrooge is always nasty to him. When Christmas is mentioned Scrooge becomes especially cross. The time that Dickens has chosen, Christmas, is perfect for showing just how mean and nasty Scrooge is. ...read more.

Conclusion

When he is asked for money by a gentleman collecting Scrooge's reaction is awful " Are there no prisons, and the union workhouse are they still in operation The treadmill and the poor law are in full vigor" He upsets the man and all because he is to mean to put a few pennies in a pot, it is not as if he cannot afford it. The invitation to spend Christmas with his nephew was turned down with an ungrateful gesture, "Bah! Humbug what reason do you have to be merry, you are poor" The way in which Marley is treated shows Scrooge's true meanness, after being left everything, Scrooge gives him the cheapest funeral that he can find. Overall I think that money has ruined Scrooges life, he has no friends and not even his family like him. Dickens is showing us that money is not everything, it cannot buy us true friends or make us happy. ...read more.

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