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In Carvers The Cathedral, the narrator throughout the story keeps judging the blind man before and after he meets him.

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Introduction

Exposition: The first 3 pages of the story you could say is the exposition. The narrator explains us in details about his wife's past and how he met her, and also how she met Robert. It helps us understand who Robert is, and what history he has with the wife and tells us a little about how the narrator feels about Robert coming to visit his wife and him. Complication: The complication begins when Robert arrives at the narrators' house. Before Robert arrives the narrator was already judging him and hating the fact that he is coming to visit. As soon as the narrator saw Robert from the window he began judging him again by saying things like, "This blind man, feature this, he was wearing a full beard! A beard on a blind man! ...read more.

Middle

(Carver, 2006, p. 80). Climax: The turning point in this story actually starts from the dinner, where they all are getting comfortable with each other's company, and the climax starts getting even deeper when Robert and the narrator start to smoke marijuana. You can see that the narrator starts appreciating the fact that Robert has come to visit, "Then I said, "I'm glad for the company. And I guess I was" (Carver, 2006, p.85). But the main climax begins when this Cathedral "documentary" shows up on TV, and the narrator tries and describes to the blind Robert what they are showing on TV. To make Robert understand what a Cathedral is, he asks the narrator to bring some heavy papers and a pen so that he could follow the narrators' hand while he was busy drawing a cathedral for Robert. ...read more.

Conclusion

"It's really something", I said" (Carver, 2006, p. 89), you can sense that the narrator has experienced seeing without his eyes, he has experienced what Robert goes through daily. Ironic: In Carver's "The Cathedral," the narrator throughout the story keeps judging the blind man before and after he meets him. He judges him on his marriage, his looks, and some of his actions. The irony of this story is when the narrator and Robert draw the cathedral and when Robert asks the narrator to close his eyes while drawing it. This way the narrator will feel how it is to be "blind" and what Robert experiences. This will help the narrator not to be so judgmental before experiencing what others go through. Reference: * Carver,R. (2006). Cathedral In P. Shreve & B. M. Nguyen (Eds.), 30/30: Thirty American stories from the last thirty years (pp. 76-89). New York: Pearson. Harshita Tirthdas ...read more.

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