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In this essay I will be writing about how Charles Dickens uses the story Oliver Twist to expose the appalling treatment of poor children in Victorian Britain.

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Introduction

In this essay I will be writing about how Charles Dickens uses the story Oliver Twist to expose the appalling treatment of poor children in Victorian Britain. Oliver Twist was written in 1837-9, this period in Britain history was known as the Victorian period. Life in Britain was changing a lot at this time, more and more people were moving to the city due to the Industrial Revolution. Most of the people, who were moving to the city, were living in the country. There were a lot of negative effects of lots of people moving to the city, it was getting really overcrowded and there was a lack of housing. The housing conditions of poor people in cities like London at the time, were absolutely disgusting, there was no running water and no heating. At the time their was a really cruel and sick law called the 'Poor Law', the poor law meant that all poor people had to go to a workhouse. I think the workhouse was absolutely disgusting and sick. I think that this law was very bad and unfair to the poor people. Now on to Oliver Twist. ...read more.

Middle

The master, in his cook's uniform, stationed himself at the copper; his pauper assistants ranged themselves behind him; the gruel was served out; and a long grace was said over the short commons. The gruel disappeared; the boys whispered each other, and winked at Oliver; while his next neighbours nudged him. Child as he was, he was desperate with hunger, and reckless with misery. He rose from the table; and advancing to the master, basin and spoon in hand, said: somewhat alarmed at his own temerity: "Please, sir, I want some more." The master was a fat, healthy man; but he turned very pale. He gazed in stupefied astonishment on the small rebel for some seconds, and then clung for support to the copper. The assistants were paralysed with wonder; the boys with fear. "What!" said the master at length, in a faint voice. "Please, sir," replied Oliver, "I want some more." The master aimed a blow at Oliver's head with the ladle; pinioned him in his arms; and shrieked aloud for the beadle. The board were sitting in solemn conclave, when Mr. Bumble rushed into the room in great excitement, and addressing the gentleman in the high chair, said, "Mr. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was very unlike their general mode of doing business, if they had; but still, as he had no particular wish to revive the rumour, he twisted his cap in his hands, and walked slowly from the table." Oliver doesn't get apprenticed to the chimney sweep, because the board decided that it would be unsafe to let Oliver be a chimney sweeper. Instead they got Oliver an apprenticeship with Mr Sowerberry. As the story progresses Oliver finishes the apprenticeship and arrives in London. Charles Dickens introduces a new character called Fagin. Fagin is described as a very bad and greedy person, he is a criminal. He first gives poor children food and shelter, and then teaches them to handle bags etc. He done the same to Oliver, when Oliver arrived in London, he gave Oliver food and shelter and taught him how to steal. The money the young juveniles steal they give it to Fagin. As the story continues Fagin dies and Oliver's situation changed. Mr. Brownlow adopted Oliver and they lived peacefully. Oliver finally got a person who would love him and take care of him. That was the story of Oliver Twist and his sad memories of how poor children lived and how they were treated in the 19th century. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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