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In what ways does Golding make this, such an important and disturbing moment in the novel? (pg 140-143)

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Introduction

In what ways does Golding make this, such an important and disturbing moment in the novel? (pg 140-143) Golding uses intense symbolism and atmospheric setting throughout this passage and the remainder of the book, through the characters, their speech and actions as well as through specific objects such as the fire. Each of the main characters represents a different outlook on life; Piggy represents the law and order of the civilized world. Throughout the novel, Piggy attempts to condition the island society to mirror the society they all previously lived in, in England. Piggy's continual references to his auntie demonstrate this philosophy. He tries to pull Ralph towards the reason-orientated side of human nature. Piggy is obsessed with the signal-fire. This is because he wants to return to England where adults and some form of protection and order are, but also because the fire is one of the only symbols of stability on the island. ...read more.

Middle

Golding uses the characters' speech to show the degeneration of their society and the culture which they were brought up within and that Ralph had attempted to maintain on the island. It becomes unclear as to who is speaking at any given time in the novel and all the characters seem to speak as one, as they finish each other's sentences, are classified in groups like 'the littluns' and 'Samneric'. No longer is there any individual identity on the island just categories that the boys fit into. There is no longer any attempt at finding out the names of the younger boys they are just referred to as the 'littluns' collectively, as are the twins, originally 'Sam and Eric' but now 'Samneric'. Golding also uses 'the game' here, to emphasize just how brutal their culture has become before he ultimately overwhelms the reader with the final demonstration of the natural, vicious human instinct that is the main theme of the novel. During 'the game' the boys viciously repeat their chant, 'Kill the pig! ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that we suddenly see Ralph as a character similar to Jack, as he returns to his natural savage human instincts stuns the reader and builds up the atmosphere of disbelief and astonishment until the even greater shock that they receive from Jack at the close of this segment of the novel which, signifies the poignant decline in their once civilized culture turned brutal and cruel. When Robert says, '"You want a real pig, because you've got to kill him"' after the suggestion of a drum, a fire and someone to pretend to be a pig whilst they play 'the game', and Jack replies, '"Use a littlun" ... and everybody laughed' we see the most outrageous show of the removal of care and kindness from within their savage society yet. Golding cleverly uses the art of astounding the reader after the creation of a fitting atmosphere to make this a highly significant moment in the novel. Dimple Shah ...read more.

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