• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Jane Eyre: Chapter 26 Essay

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jane Eyre: Chapter 26 Essay Charlotte Bront� wrote Jane Eyre in 1847. Throughout this novel Bront� criticises and challenges some views and believes that she experienced herself within the injustice of the Victorian society. In this essay, I will be focusing on Chapter 26 to discuss the elements Bront� uses such as building up tension throughout the wedding until the discovery of Bertha. Secondly, I will be analysing the context of the novel, discussing the writing techniques Bront� uses to create an appealing novel for a 19th century audience. From the beginning of the novel, we are invited to share Jane's thoughts and feeling through the use of 1st person narrative. This allows us to share her fears and excitement. The gothic elements in the novel such as the "demonic laugh" create a sense of dread. This is heightened by the pathetic fallacy of "the great horse-chestnut at the bottom of the orchard had been struck by lightning in the night, and half of it split away" that symbolizes the happy union of Jane and Rochester and that is split in two. Therefore at the beginning of chapter 26 we are already afraid that something is going to ruin the marriage. At the start of chapter 26, Bront� presents Jane's and Mr. ...read more.

Middle

He is emotionless, strong and cold from the outside, but inside his world is of fire which symbolizes his passion and rage as a threat. This is further emphasized as Bront� uses the repetition of the word "without" and the alliterative in the quote "without speaking, without smiling, without seeming" heightens Rochester's lack of any signs of warmth towards Jane at a time when she needs comforting making this line effective. However, Rochester's body language contrasts with his emotions indicated by his "hot and strong grasp." This suggests the heat of the fire has penetrated through the deep icy walls of his rock-like body and further suggests his difficulty in keeping in control. But, the verb "riveted" stresses his determination to keep his possession of Jane when he is likely to lose her. But, he also denies almost her rights as an individual treating her as an object. Jane does not utter a word throughout the short ceremony as she is "calm and collected" and "in no danger of swooning." which further emphasise Jane's courage in adversity contrasting with the stereotypes of the fragile Victorian Lady. Bronte emphasises Jane's strength again when the wedding party moves to the attic where we meet Bertha, the first Mrs Rochester or "the madwoman in the attic" is an intriguing subject. ...read more.

Conclusion

This makes the next part of the novel inevitable, and also explains the moral purposes of Bront�, and the need for Rochester to suffer. This novel is often interpreted as a political book because it explores the idea of woman [Jane] alone, in charge of her own life and decisions. Jane could easily be described as a "feminist." She rejects the man she loves until such time as she can be his equal. She would rather be alone and independent than with Rochester on his terms. To conclude, I think that Jane Eyre is an interesting book that will appeal to readers both now and in the 19th century as some of the injustices are still occurring today. Bronte used many techniques in this book to build up tension throughout the ceremony. For example, she uses the method of 'Pathetic Fallacy' as well as many symbols of bad omens to create suspense. She also uses aspects from the history of her time like class boundaries, equality very effectively to make the reader aware of the hardships of being a woman in a patriarchal society. Another way in which Bronte creates tension is by using the shifts in power between Jane and Rochester making this chapter an effective climax to the novel. ?? ?? ?? ?? Salma Said 10RGM English Coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Jane Eyre : Textual Analysis of Chapter 26

    As the passage progresses we encounter the 'figures of two strangers'. Their significance is as yet unrecognised, but their unconscious presence before their secondary introduction makes the scene feel that all is not as it should be. The inappropriate reference to 'the few mossy headstones' also gives the air that something is awry.

  2. Compare chapter 7 from 'Jane Eyre' with the extract from chapter 1 of 'Roll ...

    Miss Temple, Jane's teacher is a really cheerful person by the way she tries to make the best of even the worst things, 'as she said 'like stalwart soldiers', this is said to the girls to in courage them when they're on the way back from church during the cold winter.

  1. Jane Eyre Essay

    Jane describes the room as she looks round it "I lifted my head and tried to look boldly around the dark room; at this moment a light gleamed on the wall.

  2. Analyse and evaluate Bronte's presentation of Rochester and St John Rivers

    Oliver and again shows no feelings when he actually feels strongly about Miss Oliver and he has learnt to suppress his emotions. Rochester often spoke to Jane with commanding language such as; "you must just stand to one side" he often apologizes about this but as it comes automatically to

  1. Considering Charlotte Bront's 'Jane Eyre' and Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice', To What Extent ...

    "There is plenty of evidence to suggest that by the 1830's - 40's, the definition of women as primarily relating to the home and family was well established"6, the new middle class way of life involved a recodification of the roles of men and women.

  2. Examine the presentation of Jane Eyres childhood in chapter 1-8 and discuss the way ...

    In chapter two, more of Jane's characteristics are revealed to how she reacts to her surroundings and how people treat her. "I resisted all the way; a new thing for me." Showing how Jane reacts to major tremor in her young life, throughout her childhood of the first 8 chapters.

  1. Jane Eyre Chapter 1-26

    But servitude! That must be a matter of fact.' Jane is alone and yet she craves comfort and company with others. She rethinks her dreams and settles for reality: 'What do I want? A new place, in a new house, amongst new faces, under new circumstances.

  2. Jane Eyre Essay. Analyse the ways in which Bronte presents the wedding of ...

    The two unknown strangers are like representations of something bad lurking in the background, "two shadows only moved in a remote corner,", in a normal wedding strangers wouldn't just show up without their presence being questioned, and you that they must have a reason for being there; the connotations of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work