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John Proctor: A Man To Be Admired

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John Proctor, a man to be admired. Discuss. Arthur Miller had no intention to compose a book based on the Salem witch trials. Claiming he was no "scholar, or perhaps a historian", the comparisons between these events and on-going ones such as The Red Scare and McCarthyism had directed him to elaborate in such calamity and distress. The Crucible, successor of Miller's other playwrights as in "All My Sons" and "Death of a Salesman", is play which portrays the events which occurred in 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts, USA. In The Crucible, John Proctor is, to some extent, worshipped. To the public in Salem, he seems to have no flaws whatsoever; is idolized by many, including Abigail Williams, and even though committing sins, for instance adultery, he still retains this status. Arthur Miller portrays him as a "tormented individual" but only to the readers, he believes he has damaged himself in the eyes of God, Elizabeth and himself which causes him to wallow in self-pity and inferiority. The broken trust between John and Elizabeth is merely the only weakness he has, as this intensifies his inability to forgive himself. ...read more.


Proctor takes this into heavy account as his desire to stay honest and his desire to preserve his family is tearing him apart. But as Reverend Hale states above, God will forgive him if he confesses, but to what? Confess to a lie. Scene 4 shows his ultimate struggle but his courage and pride brings himself to peace as he decides that his death is the answer to all problems. In my opinion, a man with such integrity who puts his own wife in front of his own remaining existence is a man to be surely admired and respected, even in wrong doing; he seeks salvation which gives him a "holy" aspect. Looking at the "holy" concept, the fact that Proctor's death was part of the reason why it stopped steadily, it seems as Miller depicts him as a 17th century version of Jesus. How Christians believe he died for their sins; Proctor dies for the welfare of those accused and the stop of this fundamental accusations. He did do wrong: he committed a sin. ...read more.


He faces death, just to keep his name clean, to live or die with respect. For him to go through so many calamities and distress that the only time he feels at peace is when he dies. And he still remains as an admirable figure after he's public confession of being an adulterer. He put his own wife in front of himself, just to receive her forgiveness and trust. "He have his goodness now. God forbid I take it from him!" Elizabeth accepts it, the only way; his death is the answer to all their problems. His Christian morals and beliefs lead him to becoming a better man; a man with faith is a man to be admired in my opinion. He knows that even if he confesses a lie, he can not base the remainder of his life on another lie, which will then jeopardize his relationship; other innocent people will die and will evidently never forgive himself. Overall, Proctor is a: religious, emancipated, loving, family, integrity-filled and respected man, and if these are not the quality of being admirable then I do not know what is. John Proctor, a man to be admired. Discuss. By Ranja Faraj ...read more.

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