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Prospero and Miranda's relationship in the Tempest is a strongly bonded one.

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Introduction

Tempest Coursework Prospero and Miranda's relationship in the Tempest is a strongly bonded one. However, Prospero has a very strict control over Miranda, especially any aspects relating to sexual relations. Prospero loves having and controlling power, and Miranda is another thing to add to his list, which he can have complete power over. Like every parent and their children, they are bound to have arguments at some points through their life, but these hardly change the relationship between them. In the time that Shakespeare was writing this play, woman played less important roles in society that men did, so we have to take this into account. There are also many different ways in interpreting what Shakespeare has said, so sometimes, we have to choose what we, ourselves think is right. From the beginning of the play, we can tell that Prospero and Miranda's relationship is a strong one, when Prospero uniforms her of their past. Miranda is obviously very close to her father, because when he tells Miranda about being usurped by his "false brother" Antonio, this immediately provokes hatred in Miranda. If she wasn't so close to her father, and did not love him as much, then she wouldn't have been so moved by what she just heard. ...read more.

Middle

When Miranda and Ferdinand meet for the first time, they talk to each other so romantically and passionately. Miranda says to Ferdinand: "I might call him A thing divine, for nothing natural I ever saw so noble." Words like "divine," "natural" and "noble" really express hoe much Miranda likes Ferdinand. Ferdinand says to Miranda; "Most sure the goddess On whom these airs attend!-Vouchsafe my prayer." The word "goddess" shows how Ferdinand views Miranda. Prospero as the protective father, does not like all this sort of talk and says: "A word, good sir; I fear you have done yourself some wrong. A word." Miranda gets angry with her father for being so forceful towards the one she loves, as I think any daughter would. She does not dare show her anger to her father, so she shoes that she is upset: "Why speaks my father so ungently?" We soon realise that Prospero is conjuring up a tesr for Ferdinand to see if hios love for Miranda is really as strong as he says it is. This is a very loving thing to do for Miranda, as he wants to make sure that Ferdinand is the right one for her. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a horrible image, but Prospero is just doing it in order to protect his only daughter, in all the ways that he possible can. Prospero just wants their love to be preserved. Prospero then wants to spirits to give the happy couple a blessing. Prospero says: "Well! - Now come, my Ariel; bring a corollary Rather than want a spirit. Appear, and pertly. No tongue, all eyes, be silent." This is a lovely idea that Prospero has come up with, to please his daughter and her fianc�. We can see that Prospero is just trying to do the best for his child, and to make her happy, as there is a "contract of true love to celebrate." From all of this we can see that Prospero is just another typical father (but using magic). Prospero loves having and controlling people, and Miranda is another one to add to his list. Of course, they have arguments, as all parents with their children do, but even if he did come across to the audience a being quite a harsh character to his daughter, it was really, only for her own good. I think that all Prospero actually wanted was true love for her, and to protect and care for her in every way possible. ...read more.

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