• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Battle of Liege, 1914.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Battle of Liege, 1914 This is a story is about the forts of Li�ge, but it is also about the men who manned them. A group of men from the tiny country of Belgium that stood up to one of the world's superpowers, one with a seemingly invincible army. The German government had asked Belgium to kindly step aside so its 2 million-man army could pass through on its way to destroying France, thus making Belgium a state within the German Reich. But Belgium refused to give in to the ultimatum made by Germany, and for 12 days, put up a fight that had the whole world watching. ...read more.

Middle

It started when the German Army crossed the frontier into the neutral area of Belgium intending to attack France from the north. This marked the start of the German Schlieffen Plan. The initial aim of the Second Army, which comprised 320,000 men, was to seize the city of Liege, which blocked the narrow gap to the best entrance into Belgium and further more into France. However a ring of twelve heavily armed forts that were built in the 1880s, six on each side of the Meuse River and each 3-5km apart, defended Liege. ...read more.

Conclusion

Nevertheless, the Germans could not hope to continue their advance through Belgium without first capturing the forts. In order to assist with this the Germans introduced a weapon, which was unknown to the Allies. It was an Austrian-built 17-inch howitzer. With the significant aid of the howitzers and the Big Bertha gun the forts were finally taken on 16th of August. The following day the German Second Army, together with First and Third Armies, began to implement the next stage of the Schlieffen Plan, which was to embark upon a wide sweeping wheel through Belgium, forcing the Belgian army back to Antwerp. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. Why did Britain win the Battle of Britain?

    This was an important and valuable contribution and would have furthermore helped the British to success.

  2. Pre 1914 War Poetry - The Drum and Drummer Hodge analysed.

    The first line carries on the idea of deception; that they are selling their liberty, and the second line indicates that it's for nothing. 'Charms' is also a word linked with deception, such as when someone can "charm" another to do something, and the use of the word 'charms' is also linked to the idea that war is seducing.

  1. The Battle of Britain.

    This interpretation is a primary piece of evidence that is photo evidence and was very effective at the time. It has a core of truth and shows a typical example of the people sacrificing themselves for the British beliefs. This is a very selective view though, and is particularly patriotic and nationalistic.

  2. The popular myth of the Battle of Britain quickly emerged during the early part ...

    that the people did not hear the truth, this was easily achieved by them because they controlled all the forms of media. There was no reason for the nation to not believe what they constantly saw and heard. The myth was 'the few' young brave pilots that saved the world

  1. The Battle of Britain

    This was highly successful as they it caused some disunity between Park's South Eastern region and Leigh Mallory's north region. These strategic bombing brought Britain to its knees and the situation was worsening. Therefore Churchill realized that public support and morale would be needed if he was to survive the

  2. English Short Story

    The enemy had now had seven hours in which to learn of the movement and prepare to meet it. General Johnston says: "The Federal troops extended their intrenched line [we did not intrench] so rapidly to their left that it was found necessary to transfer Cleburne's division to Hardee's corps

  1. English Short story

    We watched him with suspended breath, our hearts in our mouths. On one occasion of this kind, indeed, one of our number, an impetuous stammerer, was so possessed by his emotion that he shouted at me: "I'll b-b-bet you t-two d-d-dollars they d-drop him b-b-before he g-gets to that d-d-ditch!"

  2. Why did Britain win the battle of Britain?

    G�ring did nothing to clarify strategy between his commanders, obsessed as he was with maintaining his own powerbase in the Luftwaffe and indulging his outdated beliefs on air fighting, which were later to lead to tactical and strategic errors. The Luftwaffe was ill-served by their lack of intelligence on the British defences.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work