• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The past comes back to haunt Mr Rochester on his wedding day. Does the reader sympathise with him or do we sympathise with Jane?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'The past comes back to haunt Mr Rochester on his wedding day. Does the reader sympathise with him or do we sympathise with Jane?' In Chapter 26 Jane and Mr Rochester were planning to get married. During the service we are told that Mr Rochester is actually already married. This comes as a big surprise to everyone including Jane. At that exact moment in time we feel most sorry for Jane. Jane has had a terrible life and this really was the first good thing that had happened to her. The build up to the wedding was slow and although it did seem to be leading up to something we couldn't be sure of what. Since Mr Rochester knew that he was married, I think that he might have had an idea that something like this could happen, but Jane really did have a big shock to deal with. At that precise moment in time, we sympathise most with Jane. We have no idea who the wife is or any background to the issues surrounding the first wedding. Although it does appear to be Jane who is in the worst position, soon enough Bronte is able to change our views completely. ...read more.

Middle

We know exactly how she feels but not so much how Mr Rochester feels. I also feel that Bronte builds up the intensity and excitement to the wedding thus increasing the tension regarding what is going to happen next. In addition, it keeps our interest focused and makes us as the reader excited and wanting to read on to find out what happens next. Another event that happens is that before the wedding Jane sees two men standing outside of the church. We do not know who they are and neither does Jane. When we find out that it is not possible for Jane to marry Mr Rochester, in the back of our minds we remember these two men and link them to the scene. Jane thought that something was not right but did not think any more of it. QUOTE When the news of Mr Rochester's wife is announced, Jane describes his emotions. "Mr Rochester, on hearing the name, set his teeth; he experienced too a sort of strong conclusive quiver; near to him as I was, I felt the spasmodic movement of fury and despair run through his frame." When she says this she makes him seem full of emotion inside and angry. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another point that we think about is how Adele's mother cheated on Mr Rochester and left him with Adele with no word or financial help. All these point combined do make us feel sorry for Mr Rochester. We thought Jane was the one who 'should' have been, who everyone felt sorry for, but Bronte changes our mind. We thought that Mr Rochester had had a really good life but slowly we begin to see that actually he hasn't. He appears to be the 'victim' in the story (although we do also feel sorry for Jane). The past really does come back to haunt Mr Rochester on his wedding day. At the moment we are told that Mr Rochester is married we feel most sorry for Jane. She is the one has been upset the most all through her life. Nothing has really gone right for her including the wedding. We feel that she has been cheated and lied to. We do not really feel sorry for Mr Rochester until the end of this section of the narrative section. After this I feel sorry for them both. We begin to sympathise with Mr Rochester when we find out about Bertha. By the end, I imagine that the reader feels equally sorry for both Jane and Mr Rochester and that this comes as a surprise, making the story more complicated and enjoyable. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Analyse the ways in which Bronte presents the "wedding" of Jane and Rochester and ...

    Jane is just a governess, but Rochester owns Thornfield and is worth twenty thousand pounds whereas all the money Jane has in the world is just a few shillings. Jane was not accepted by the Ingrams who were upperclass just as Rochester is; this was further emphasised by their rude remarks towards governesses.

  2. Analyse the ways in which Bronte presents the "wedding" of Jane and Rochester and ...

    Jane is not like most 19th century women for she has determination unlike conventional women who are just pretty, passive and quite ordinary example of this is Miss Blanche Ingram. One main and important difference to me is that Jane gives her opinions, but Blanche is just an echo of what other people say.

  1. The Real Charlotte - review

    The involvement of Julia in Charlotte's affairs makes a significant contribution to this revelation to the reader. Julia's suffering progresses while Charlotte's success increases. 'She (Julia) had sunk while Charlotte had risen'. Therefore, we sympathise with Julia's plight, and are antagonistic towards Charlotte. Our judgement of her is henceforth affected.

  2. Did the Normans build a Motte and Bailey castle at Rochester?

    This is therefore suggesting that the same land was used to build the present Rochester Castle on, as was used for the Motte and Bailey if there ever was one.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work