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What do we learn about Charles Dickens On the treatment of children

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Introduction

Oliver Twist What do we learn about Charles Dickens On the treatment of children in Victorian times? Charles Dickens serialised the novel of Oliver Twist between the years of 1837 and 1839. England's economic system at this time was very poorly, as there was a gap in between those whom were rich and those whom were poor in these difficult times. A workhouse was established in the year of 1830, were many orphaned children and famine based families spent their lives. The workhouse was established because of the poor law system, which was supposed to help those who were poor, disabled or orphaned. Those who lived in these workhouses were mistreated, with given only one glass of water and one serving of gruel daily with labour given to them throughout the day. ...read more.

Middle

An example of a working class citizen would be Charles Dickens. At the age of twelve, Dickens was made to leave education and placed in a factory. Within a few weeks his father was jailed in a debtor's prison, where he was eventually joined by Dickens's mother and siblings. Dickens lived on his own at this point. Being temporary orphaned he carried on working in the factory. He was taught by a senior worker how to work more efficiently. Oliver's life demonstrates the ways in which children were treated. He had been orphaned as a baby which was commonly known in Dickens's time and was made to live in a workhouse. In the middle-class English society, those who couldn't support themselves were considered immoral. ...read more.

Conclusion

The board thought that the workhouse was a brilliant idea, that it was a form of punishment and a way of keeping people off of London streets. The board represents those of the middle-class who feel as though those of the lower-class deserve to be kept separated from those of the middle-class and deserve to be treated like constant workers. Oliver being sold tells the reader that adults believed that orphaned children's lives were worthless but were good for trading and being sold. Dickens manipulates the reader into feeling sympathy for Oliver. He uses language to make Oliver out to be the victim like most orphans were in them days. London symbolises chance and freedom which the reader feels that Oliver should receive but when Oliver arrives there he finds things he has never seen before such as dark alleyways, prostitution etc. ...read more.

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