• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What do we learn about Charles Dickens On the treatment of children

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Oliver Twist What do we learn about Charles Dickens On the treatment of children in Victorian times? Charles Dickens serialised the novel of Oliver Twist between the years of 1837 and 1839. England's economic system at this time was very poorly, as there was a gap in between those whom were rich and those whom were poor in these difficult times. A workhouse was established in the year of 1830, were many orphaned children and famine based families spent their lives. The workhouse was established because of the poor law system, which was supposed to help those who were poor, disabled or orphaned. Those who lived in these workhouses were mistreated, with given only one glass of water and one serving of gruel daily with labour given to them throughout the day. ...read more.

Middle

An example of a working class citizen would be Charles Dickens. At the age of twelve, Dickens was made to leave education and placed in a factory. Within a few weeks his father was jailed in a debtor's prison, where he was eventually joined by Dickens's mother and siblings. Dickens lived on his own at this point. Being temporary orphaned he carried on working in the factory. He was taught by a senior worker how to work more efficiently. Oliver's life demonstrates the ways in which children were treated. He had been orphaned as a baby which was commonly known in Dickens's time and was made to live in a workhouse. In the middle-class English society, those who couldn't support themselves were considered immoral. ...read more.

Conclusion

The board thought that the workhouse was a brilliant idea, that it was a form of punishment and a way of keeping people off of London streets. The board represents those of the middle-class who feel as though those of the lower-class deserve to be kept separated from those of the middle-class and deserve to be treated like constant workers. Oliver being sold tells the reader that adults believed that orphaned children's lives were worthless but were good for trading and being sold. Dickens manipulates the reader into feeling sympathy for Oliver. He uses language to make Oliver out to be the victim like most orphans were in them days. London symbolises chance and freedom which the reader feels that Oliver should receive but when Oliver arrives there he finds things he has never seen before such as dark alleyways, prostitution etc. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Oliver Twist section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Oliver Twist essays

  1. How effectively does Charles Dickens use language to portray 19th century London society in ...

    This can be compared to Fagin as of being, 'old shrivelled Jew,' 'villainous looking.' This shows us the vast difference even in physical appearance of a man whose whole life had been devoted to crime and on the other hand a man who had nothing but love and kindness in his heart.

  2. How Dickens exposes awful treatment of children

    one of many families, which have suffered from the poverties of Victorian England. Dickens uses this opportunity to shock the reader with his descriptions of the room where a family have been living (though barely alive). As Oliver and Mr Sowerberry enter the room one of the first things that

  1. How does Charles Dickens expose Victorian society's awful treatment of the poor?

    as anyone would be hungry with the little food that they got. Further proof that any requests for food were dealt with severely is when Oliver asks for more. The master can't believe what he has heard: 'What! said the master in a faint voice.'

  2. How effectively does Charles Dickens use language to portray 19th century London society in ...

    However it is due to the poor living conditions that these people had to join the ranks of criminals to survive, as it was their only way to live. In Dickens's portrayal of the upper class he displays a kindness and generosity that is fortunately absent in dealing with the middle class.

  1. How Does Charles Dickens Expose Victorian Society's Awful Treatment of Children of the Poor

    Even though it was given to him by chance, it refers to the huge reversals of fortune he will have. Mrs. Mann is in charge of the branch workhouse where Oliver lives with twenty or thirty other boys. She is supposed to look after them, but doesn't feed them of clothe them properly.

  2. In what ways does dickens create effective images of people and places. Explore this idea ...

    Let me stay here and be a servant. Don't send me back to the wretched place I came from. Have mercy upon a poor boy, sir; do!' " This tells the reader that he likes staying there and wants to stay here he is comfortable and by the looks of things can tell the old gentleman almost anything.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work