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Geography-Theory for Urban Zones-Sphere of influence

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Introduction

Sphere of influence "The sphere of influence is the area surrounding a settlement that is affected by the settlement's activities." From http://www.bbc.co.uk The sphere of influence of a shop is how far people will be prepared to go to make use of that shop. For example if people decide to travel a long distances for a shop that shop will have a big sphere of influence. But if a people didn't feel it was necessary to travel long distances to go there shop has a small sphere of influence. The corner shops particularly has a small sphere of influence because as explained earlier in shopping hierarchy people travel by foot only talking a few minutes so ...read more.

Middle

Now to research into spheres of influence in my study area of south east of England we where provided with a questionnaire to ask shoppers local shopping centre. It had to include questions on where they have come from ,what method of transport they used, how long they stop at the centre on average, what they mainly buy there and how often they use the shopping centre. This gave me plenty of data to present and use to describe and explain the centre's sphere of influence. The two places I did that the survey were Woolwich and Bexleyheath. ...read more.

Conclusion

People come only a short distance to buy daily newspapers, bread, milk and other convenience goods, these products are whereou can buy anywhere, often for the same price. A a large environment would have a wider sphere of influence. Department stores and specialist shops sell comparison goods such as furniture which people can compare the prices with other stores around for before purchasing. According to the theory of the 'Sphere of influence' where you can buy anywhere, often for the same price. A large environment would have a wider sphere of of influence. Department stores and specialist shops sell comparison goods such as furniture which people can compare the prices with other stores around for before purchasing. According to the theory of the 'Sphere of influence' ...read more.

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