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Describe the ways in which the methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were different

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Introduction

Describe the ways in which the methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were different... In 1897 the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) was set up. This brought together 500 local organizations with more than 50,000 members, headed by Millicent Fawcett. The organization used peaceful and legal ways to try and win the vote for women. But some women decided that lawful tactics weren't enough and chose to use more aggressive methods to achieve their goals. These women, headed by the Pankhurst family, set up their own organization called the Womens Social and Political Union (WSPU) and became known as the 'Suffragettes'. To distinguish between the two, members of the NUWSS where labeled 'Suffragists'. ...read more.

Middle

But these methods seemed to have little to no effect on the situation as many of the bills that were introduced into the House of Commons, due to their ongoing efforts, were either rejected or talked out. The Suffragettes, after witnessing the Suffragists lack of progress decided to take things into their own hands. Unfortunately their methods did not limit themselves within the law. Suffragettes adopted almost terrorist-like mentalities and were prepared to act outside the law using violent and unlawful means. Along with participating in Suffragist-like means of protest, Suffragettes were known to have harassed MP's, taken part in stone throwing, disturbed political meetings, destroyed property, heckled Cabinet Ministers and to the dismay of prisons around the country, adopted a firm stance on hunger striking as a weapon. ...read more.

Conclusion

As a result, people began to take notice and women's suffrage became a major issue. This taught the Suffragettes, in their eyes, an invaluable lesson: militancy 'paid off'. Putting aside their differences, one thing that both Suffragettes and Suffragists had to deal with was 'factionalism'. Throughout the campaigns both camps had divisions throughout their membership ranging from geographical location to social status. This meant that it was almost impossible for the leaders of the organizations to control the actions of each and every faction. One thing that did aid the Suffragists cause was their affiliations to political parties and influential MP's, something which the Suffragettes could not rely on. This was mainly down to the openness of the Suffragists to outside support and compromises along with the fact that Suffragettes antagonized parties and the public resulting in little to no support or sympathy. ...read more.

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