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Describe the ways in which the Methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were Different.

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Introduction

Describe the ways in which the Methods of the Suffragists and Suffragettes were Different The struggle for women's suffrage was fought by two groups of campaigners, the suffragists and suffragettes. There was one difference between them, and that was that the suffragists used peaceful methods to gain the vote, whereas the suffragettes used violent methods. They other disagreed with each other as to who was using the best method. In 1897 the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies was formed. These were the suffragists. It was led by Millicent Fawcett. Millicent was married to a politician who supported the campaign for women's rights. They didn't believe that all women should get the vote, they merely wanted the vote on equal terms with men. They did not agree with using militant methods to gain the vote as it would hinder their chances, and make them appear irresponsible. Instead they help public meetings, sent out pamphlets and trained speakers who would talk to groups of people wanting to know more about the campaign for women's suffrage. ...read more.

Middle

but in 1906 there was a very large section of the public who were in favour of women's suffrage. But what good did that do to the cause? We call upon the government to give us the vote but they didn't. So, now we will fight for the cause". The extract explains how she believes she has been betrayed by the government, and why she believes that the suffragettes had to use violence in their protests. She explains how the politicians said once the majority of the public believes in women's suffrage the right will be granted. They didn't keep to their word and so Emmeline believes they need to "fight for the cause". The main methods they used to catch the eye of the media were chaining themselves to railings, burning down churches, MPs houses, cricket pavilions and golf clubhouses, attacking politicians, refusing to pay taxes and vandalising artwork. ...read more.

Conclusion

However with such contrasting opinions this would have been impossible. Emmeline Pankhurst wrote in her book: "What good did all this violent campaigning do us? ...For one thing our campaign made women's suffrage a matter of news - it had never been that way before. Now the newspapers are full of us." However the Prime Minister at the time, Winston Churchill, wrote to the Manchester Suffrage Society saying: "I have been annoyed lately by the action of certain suffragettes, in disturbing and breaking up my own meetings and those of other Liberal candidates. So long as this continues, it will prevent me from taking any more steps in favour of your cause". This is where the suffragist's methods seemed to have a better effect. It is often debated whether the Suffragettes helped or hindered the campaign. However both groups carried on protesting until the outbreak of war in 1914, when their campaign was grinded to a halt in order to aid soldiers in the war. After the war was over women were honoured with the right to vote. ...read more.

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