• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Irish political leader and writer Gerry Adams.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Irish political leader and writer Gerry Adams was born October 6, 1948, in the Catholic area of West Belfast, Northern Ireland. His father was a labourer and member of the Irish Republican Army who was shot and imprisoned by British forces. His mother came from a family of prominent Irish revolutionaries and nationalists. Adams grew up as part of a working-class Catholic minority that suffered social and economic discrimination at the hands of a Protestant majority community. As a teenager, Adams worked as a bartender in Belfast. When the decline of local industries led to unemployment and civil strife. Adams soon became politically active; he joined Sinn Fein, an Irish nationalist political party, and involved himself in action committees that worked to solve problems of housing, unemployment and civil rights. Adams was imprisoned without trial for several years during the 1970s, and spent much of the decade either in jail or on the run. ...read more.

Middle

began to twist the focus. In 1983 Adams was elected as MP in West Belfast, which led to his promotion to Sinn Fein president. He was now in a position to lead "the republican project" in the direction he thought most appropriate. The electoral gains made by Sinn Fein frightened London and Dublin who saw dark days ahead for the main nationalist party, John Hume's SDLP. The Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985 was seen as an attempt to secure the SDLP's position, but in 1988 Gerry Adams and John Hume were meeting in secret. Mr Hume became convinced republicans were serious about finding a political way forward and although the 1988 discussions ended amid recrimination, they began again soon afterwards and became public in 1993. In 1994 the "Hume-Adams process" eventually delivered the IRA ceasefire, which has since provided the relatively peaceful backdrop against which the Good Friday Agreement was brokered. Even more important was the vote on whether the party should take its seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly in the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998. ...read more.

Conclusion

After reading his autobiography I began to see Gerry Adams as a man and not the untouchable political figure he is perceived as. I read passages in which he spoke of his genuine love for his country and his genuine hunger for his country's freedom. He spoke of his anger towards the British government as he watched friends and comrades die in the 1981 hunger strikes and the events, which led to him becoming involved with the republican cause. After much research into the man that is Gerry Adams I have found my opinion divided. Obviously I would like to believe him when he says he is not and never has been a member of the IRA, but common sense prevents me from doing so. The question I now ask myself is should it matter whether or not he was once involved with the IRA as now it is quite clear that he would prefer to take the political, peaceful route to a united Ireland. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. How Effectively did Irish Catholic and Nationalist Leaders advance their Cause in the years ...

    Three of these men were hanged. Many felt these men weren't guilty of murder, and they became known as the Manchester martyrs. Although the Fenians were not particularly popular before this incident, the Irish were outraged by the executions and, by being made martyrs, they gained more support for their cause.

  2. The Irish Question

    It was also clear to the British government that this Agreement needed to be more favourable to the Catholic Unionists in order to gain more of their support towards the SDLP and also to calm the potential troubles brewing after the hunger strikes of 1981.

  1. the Irish question

    After Cromwell had crushed the rebellion he paid his soldiers with land taken form the Irish Catholics. Cromwell's actions caused much resentment with Irish nationalists. Cromwell had callously ordered the killing of nearly 3000 innocent Irish Catholics including women and showed no mercy in doing so, and then stole their land to pay English soldiers that did this.

  2. The Development of the IRA with special regard to the fate of Bobby Sands

    In the beginning the British Army was welcomed by the Catholic population, but this attitude changed quickly when the Army used brutal force against protesting Catholics. III. The Irish Republican Army since 1969 It is in this critical situation of the 1969 troubles, after the NICRA had begun its massive

  1. The Irish Question

    The aims which the SDLP intend to achieve with the help of your vote are given on the manifesto for 2004 and tell us that they want; more jobs, more investment, more for the community, more for farmers, more for the environment, and more for developing countries, these agree with what the general moderate Nationalists aims are.

  2. Northern Irelandsince c.1960 - questions and answers

    To make things worse for Catholics they were discriminated into further issues such as employment and politics as the Ulster Unionist Party subjugated the whole of Northern Ireland. A perfect example of this would be in the city of Londonderry as the Northern Ireland government gerrymandered by fixing constituency borders

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work