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The relationship between the two superpowers of USA and Russia worsened between 1959 and the summer of 1963 because of Castro's revolution in Cuba. This increased tensions between the two superpowers, as Castro was a Marxist who had overthrown Batista

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Introduction

Assignment 1 1. The relationship between the two superpowers of USA and Russia worsened between 1959 and the summer of 1963 because of Castro's revolution in Cuba. This increased tensions between the two superpowers, as Castro was a Marxist who had overthrown Batista who was a pro America dictator. This angered America as now they had a communist country right next to them. America did not want communism to spread out of Eastern Europe, and they were using policies of containment to stop the spread. This revolution led America to stopped buying Cuban sugar, which caused a further build up of tension between the USA and Russia. They stopped buying the sugar in an attempt to weaken the Cuban economy and therefore try and get Cuba to become a capitalist state. To help Cuba, Russia stepped in and started buying their sugar helping Cuba, which is not what the American's wanted. This then created more tension between USA and Russia and their relationship worsened. The result of this revolution and the Russian trade with Cuba was the Bay of Pigs fiasco, which again worsened the relations between the superpowers. It was an American attack on a communist state. The invasion was a total disaster, Russia viewed it as an American attempt to overthrow Cuba's legal government, and thus helped Cuba. This led to Russia seeing Kennedy as a weak leader, as he made too many mistakes such as the Bay of Pigs invasion. ...read more.

Middle

Due to this view Khruschev was less likely to negotiate with Kennedy as he thought he was weak and this made a crisis more likely. The short term reason that finally sparked off the crisis over Cuba was when Castro turned to Russia for support because he was feeling more threatened than ever by America. Russia, meanwhile, was feeling threatened by US nuclear missiles in Turkey so they placed their own medium ranged nuclear missiles in their bases in Cuba. These missiles sparked off the Cuban crisis as it scared America as its own citizens were under threat. The crisis was worsened as America could prove Khruschev was lying to them as he said he had no intention of placing nuclear missiles in Cuba but the U2 photographs of the Russian basses proved nuclear missiles were on Cuba. This made the Crisis start as America had proof Russia was lying and that nuclear weapons were on Cuba, and America wanted these missiles removed as quickly as possible, while Russia wanted to keep their only nuclear missiles in range of America where they were. 3. The superpowers were able to resolve the conflict without going to war as both countries had a lot to lose by attacking each other. Both countries would have millions of casualties and the world could be placed in a nuclear holocaust, with billions of innocent people killed if war did occur and they used their nuclear missiles. ...read more.

Conclusion

The significance of this was the Russians thought it meant that the West accepted the iron curtain as a fact of life and that their influence in Eastern Europe couldn't be questioned. This improved relations as America accepted the communist control of Eastern Europe. When Brezhnev came to power in Russia he also helped the Russian and American relationship improve as he set up the Brezhnev doctrine, in which he welcomed closer links to the west. All of these things during d�tente helped improve relations between the two super powers but in my view the biggest single event which was a result from the Cuban missile crisis was the signing of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks 1 (SALT 1) in 1972. In this the two countries agreed to limit some types of missiles and to hold talks of limiting more. It is a result of the Cuban missile crisis as both countries learnt that having a lot of missiles and weaponry is not a good thing as it could very easily cause a war. In conclusion the Cuban missile crisis was definitely a turning point in relations between the superpowers for the better. However some events did make their relationship worse but they were not results of the Cuban missile crisis, for example the Russian invasion of Afghanistan. The Cuban Crisis led to d�tente, the telephone hotline and the realisation that both sides have a responsibility to the whole world not to go to war so this proves that it was a turning point in relations between the superpowers. ?? ?? ?? ?? Antonio Margaritelli ...read more.

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