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"The Russo-Japanese war was the most important cause of the 1905 revolution" To what extent do you agree with this interpretation?

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Introduction

"The Russo-Japanese war was the most important cause of the 1905 revolution" To what extent do you agree with this interpretation? In 1905, Russia saw growing discontent throughout the country, leading to a revolution, which was sparked off by many different factors. Many historians believed that the most important cause of the revolution was the Russo-Japanese War, as it was the first major turning point in the lead up to the revolution. Therefore I Believe that the Russo-Japanese War was an important cause of the revolution but arguably there was other important causes, for example rural, urban and political problems. Clearly, the Russo-Japanese War was an important cause of the revolution as it triggered many strikes and revolts in Russia and also caused distress within the Russian Army. In 1904, the Japanese laid siege on Port Arthur, which led to a war between Russia and Japan after several years of clashes between their imperialist's ambitions in the Far East. ...read more.

Middle

The biggest problem was the emancipation of the Serfs in 1861. This left great problems in rural areas including redemption taxes, lack of land and also the fact that the Mir still remained very strong. This caused great discontent within the population. To add to the discontent there was also a famine in 1891, which led to many grudges being held towards the Tsar. Short-term problems within the rural areas included two famines one in 1900 and one in 1902. Both of these led to low morale within the peasants. Again these famines were blamed on the Tsar after the emancipation of the serfs where they lost a lot of land. The reduced morale also indirectly affected the economic depression. So, it can be said that the rural problems caused great distress in Russia and played an important role on the lead up to the revolution. ...read more.

Conclusion

Greater depression in rural and urban areas led to increased political opposition against the Tsar which ultimately was an important problem leading to the revolution. The main opposition towards the Tsar was from the middle class who wanted a louder political voice. After their small taste of power with the Zemstva during Alexander II reign many wanted this power back. Nicholas also faced a problem from the different nationalities in Russia who all wanted their own impendence and autocracy. This shows that political problems did contribute to the 1905 revolution. On conclusion, I believe that the Russo-Japanese War was an important cause of the 1905 revolution but it was not thee soul problem. I feel that without the other problems the revolution would not of started and that all of the problems play an equally important role in the lead up to the revolution. I also believe that the most significant cause was Bloody Sunday, which is regarded as the trigger for the revolution. Stacey Griffin 13HF ...read more.

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