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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1609

Compare two different newspapers in two different manners.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE Mathematics Coursework

Specify and Plan

The aim of this coursework is to compare two different newspapers in two different manners. The first option in which I will be comparing them is to see how many words are in a sentence, and then cover parts of each newspaper with this scheme.  

First I shall pick two newspapers, one shall be a broadsheet and one shall be a tabloid. Then, I shall pick an article from each newspaper. I would need to have picked the same articles as it would be unfair if I chose different articles. The papers must be bought on the same day, with the same date on each paper. I will then find the articles I require, and then do the tasks that I have been set.

The information from the same articles on each paper and should be counted equally, and accurate as possible.

Hypothesis:

My prediction of this project is that the tabloid paper (The Sun) shall revile that it has less words per sentence than the broadsheet (The Daily Mail) on average.

I came to this prediction because in my opinion, lower class, less knowledgeable people read tabloid papers. This way, the newspaper producers will use fewer words, and this will appeal to their most basic instincts.

...read more.

Middle

0

   6  < 10

III

3

  11 < 15

IIII I

9

  16 < 20

IIIII IIIII

19

  21 < 25

IIII IIII

28

  26 < 30

IIII

32

  31 < 35

II

34

  36 < 40

I

35

image03.png

 The graph shows that there were more words per sentence in this article in comparison to the other articles. This is shown in the sentence lengths between 11 < 25.

This shows that tabloid newspapers use fewer words per sentence to illustrate their use of pictures which will be shown at a later stage.

The next newspaper I shall be using is called The Daily Telegraph. It is known as a broadsheet newspaper, and the results will contrast to those of the tabloid newspaper.

The information I gathered varied in the mount of articles, as the articles were generally bigger.

Here is my first set of results:

    Amount

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

    1 <  5

I

1

1

   6  < 10

I

1

2

  11 < 15

IIIII I

6

8

  16 < 20

IIIII

5

13

  21 < 25

IIIII I

6

19

  26 < 30

IIIII I

6

25

  31 < 35

IIII

4

29

  36 < 40

I

1

30

image04.png

The information is gathered from an article also concerning David Beckam, but it is from another newspaper, The Daily Telegraph. As you can see that the tabloid newspaper uses more sentences  

My next article was concerning the British Number 1 seeded tennis player, Tim Henman.

It was to do with a charity games played, and here are the results that came out this article.

    Amount

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

    1 <  5

0

0

   6  < 10

0

0

  11 < 15

II

2

2

  16 < 20

II

2

4

  21 < 25

0

4

  26 < 30

IIII

4

8

  31 < 35

IIII

4

12

  36 < 40

IIII

4

16

  41 < 45

II

2

18

  46 < 50

I

1

19

  51 < 55

IIII

4

23

image05.png

...read more.

Conclusion

13

51

8  <  9

IIIII I

7

58

image08.png

As this graph shows, the amounts of pictures per page were in great contrast to that of the broadsheet newspaper. Pictures averaged around 6 – 10 a page, which is a lot considering the amount from a broadsheet.

Interpret and Discuss

The patterns that were produced from these graphs and tables were as I predicted. They were correct to the way I interpreted them, as I said that a broadsheet would contain more words per sentence, than a tabloid newspaper would. A tabloid newspaper would contain more pictures than a broadsheet newspaper.

The graphs that came out of the results were predictable. It showed that generally, there were more words per sentence and fewer pictures on a page.

My original aim was to find out which newspaper contained the most words per sentence, and the newspaper that contained the most pictures per page.

Now that I have found out which one does which, I am not surprised as it is the exact results I predicted at the beginning of this experiment.

The only way I was able to stop this coursework from being biass was to use similar articles in both papers. I chose articles that had the same name, heading, or generally where about the same topic. If I had chosen random topics, then my results would have been random, and they would not have followed the pattern that I had expected.  

This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database

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