• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Finding out How Much Acid There Is in a Solution.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Finding out How Much Acid There Is in a Solution Apparatus 250 cm3 volumetric flask 10cm3 pipette Pipette pump Burette 250cm3 conical flask 100 cm3 Beaker Funnel Digital weighing scales Rubber bung White ceramic tile Burette clamp G clamp Lab stand Quantities 13.25g Anhydrous Sodium Carbonate 250 cm3 distilled water 3cm3 methyl orange indicator 300cm3 sulphuric acid solution Method 1. Place a beaker on the weighing scales and reset the weighing scales to 0g. Add 13.5g of sodium carbonate into the beaker 2. Place the funnel into the volumetric flask and add the sodium carbonate powder into the funnel. Rinse out the beaker in which the sodium carbonate was weighed in and pour this into the funnel. Rinse out the beaker twice to ensure all remaining sodium carbonate is transferred into the volumetric flask. Wash out the funnel with distilled water and place the water into the volumetric flask. ...read more.

Middle

7. Pipette 10cm3 of the solution into the conical flask, and add 3 drops of methyl orange indicator. Mix thoroughly. Place this conical flask onto the white ceramic tile 8. Record the quantity of the sulphuric acid solution. 9. Place the burette over the conical flask so that when opened, the burette will pour the sulphuric acid solution into the conical flask containing the sodium carbonate. 10. Open the burette and allow the sulphuric acid solution to slowly drip into the sodium carbonate solution. Whilst the sulphuric acid is dripping into the sodium carbonate, constantly mix the sodium carbonate so that the sulphuric acid solution is completely mixing with the sodium carbonate solution. Allow the sulphuric acid solution to drip into the sodium carbonate solution, until the sodium carbonate solution changes colour from pink to yellow. When the colour changes, close the burette so that no more sulphuric acid solution is dripping into the sodium carbonate solution. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, a burette clamp will be used to secure the burette to the lab stand, and a G clamp will be used to secure the lab stand to the table. Sodium carbonate solution can also be irritating to skin and can be dangerous to health if ingested. Therefore, care must be taken when moving the solution into another container. Food and drink must not be eaten in the room, since a trace of sodium carbonate may be indirectly ingested. Explanation The plan will provide precise and reliable results if followed correctly. There is minimum risk of contamination, because all the glassware will be washed using distilled water. This will reduce risk of contamination because if the glassware has been used in previous experiments with different chemicals, they will be washed out. The burette and conical flask will also be primed to reduce contamination from other chemicals. Drops will be used to add the sulphuric acid solution into the sodium carbonate solution. this will ensure accurate results because a drop is about 1cm3 and so when the colour if the indicator changes, accurate results will be achieved. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Aqueous Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Aqueous Chemistry essays

  1. How much Iron (II) in 100 grams of Spinach Oleracea?

    Again using a measuring cylinder measure out 30 cm3 of Oxalic Acid (aq) and transfer it to another beaker and place this in a heated water bath set to a temperature of 70oc, place a thermometer in the solution to monitor the temperature.

  2. Find out how much acid there is in a solution

    * The conical flask must be placed right next to the volumetric flask from which the solution was taken. This will reduce the risk of any spillage. * Now let the solution of Sodium Carbonate from the pipette run into the conical flask until the last drop can be seen at the tip of the pipette.

  1. Finding out how much acid there is in a solution.

    Make sure that you wash the watch glass before you use it. Make sure you weigh 2.65g exactly. * Transfer the measured anhydrous sodium carbonate into a 250cm� beaker. Again make sure that the beaker has been cleaned with distilled water.

  2. In this experiment I am finding out how much sulphuric acid is present in ...

    and shaken, and then drops add water until the level corresponds exactly to the line. The flask is stoppered again, then shaken with inversion and swirling to give a homogeneous solution. 5. Additional distilled water should be added, rinsing the inside of the volumetric flask, funnel and beaker, to make

  1. Finding out how much acid there is in a solution.

    I will be using 250 cm of this solution of sodium carbonate as this is a sufficient amount of sodium carbonate solution in order to complete at least 6 titrations. However before placing the amounts into the equation I would need to convert the 250cm into dm: 250 = 0.25

  2. Deducing the quantity of acid in a solution

    I will carefully make up the solution to about 2cm below the mark on the neck of the flask using distilled water. I will insert the stopper and invert it 20 times to mix the contents. Using an accurate pipette, I will add enough distilled water to bring the bottom of the meniscus to the mark.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work