• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does the height of a ramp effect the stopping distance of the model travelling down it

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does the height of a ramp effect the stopping distance of the model travelling down it Introduction- I will carry out an experiment to answer this question. I will do this by making a ramp with an adjustable height and rolling a toy car down it to see how long it travels before it stops. I will then work out the work done by using this equation - Force (n) x distance (m) = work done (mgh) I predict that the greater the slope of the ramp the longer the model will take to stop. ...read more.

Middle

this means the more energy the car has, the longer it takes to stop, so the higher the ramp, the further the stopping distance. I will test the stopping distance on 5 different height ramps ranging from 0.37m to 0.77m, and I will repeat the experiment 5 times as to eliminate ant anomalous results. Fair test- To make sure the experiment is a fair test I will keep all non-variable aspects of the experiment the same (Ramp, stand, surface, toy car, ruler and where on the ramp the model starts) the only thing I will change is the ramp height. ...read more.

Conclusion

repeat steps 2-4 5 times 6. change the ramp height to be 0.1m higher 7. repeat until all 5 heights have been tested 5 times Safety- The toy cars can be unsafe if left lying around, so always keep an eye on them and put them safe when not in use. Results- Ramp hight (m) Mass (kg) Breaking force (n) Breaking distance (m) Average breaking distance (m) 1.26 0.94 0.37 0.49 0.1813 0.9 0.82 0.75 0.25 0.42 1.67 0.47 0.49 0.2303 1.4 1.242 1.52 1.2 1.24 2.4 0.57 0.49 0.2793 1.26 1.502 1.3 1.31 2.21 2.37 0.67 0.49 0.3283 2.85 2.28 2.4 1.57 1.87 2.7 0.77 0.49 0.3773 3.2 2.498 2.4 2.32 Conclusion- The results show that my prediction was right, the higher the ramp the greater the stopping distance. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To investigate the factors that affect the stopping distance of a catapulted margarine tub. ...

    4 star(s)

    I looked at how mass of an object affects its starting speed. The starting speed was found by measuring the time it took for a 10cm piece of card stuck on top of a car to pass through a light gate.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Stopping distances of toy cars travelling down a ramp

    3 star(s)

    My results show that I was correct in my hypothesis as the mass had no significant effect on the stopping distance. However my results were not at all perfect as there was some variation in the results. The second set of results show the affect of the height the car is dropped from on the stopping distance.

  1. Investigating the speed of a toy car travelling down a ramp

    tends to suggest I have a very weak, negative correlation as the trendline slopes downwards.

  2. Investigation into factors affecting the speed of a car rolling down a ramp

    If this was true then it could be graphically represented by a graph with a straight line continuing up to the origin. However, the results do not comply because by prediction only applies when there is no friction or any other force opposing the system or if the system was 100% efficient.

  1. Investigation is to see how changing the height of a ramp affects the stopping ...

    > I will use the same toy car, this is because if I used a different car for each height the mass of the toy cars will be different and may affect the stopping distance. Also if the toy car was changed for each height the frictional forces acting upon

  2. Investigation into the effect of temperature on viscosity

    Limiting factors: The angle of decent could affect the times recorded, as a ball travelling at an angle will have to cover a greater distance than one that falls directly downwards. a� + b� = c�, the ball veers to the side it will still be timed passing the same

  1. The experiment consisted of recording the results of a small toy car being allowed ...

    which we calculated earlier by Pythagoras' Theorum. The car has travelled 1.64 m when the time is just over 2.2 seconds. When we look back, this figure seems remarkably large, as the figure we acquired earlier was only 1.3 seconds (to 2sf) and we can start to see the forces which must be against the car's motion

  2. An Investigation Into The Effect Of Speed Of A Vehicle On Its Stopping Distance.

    An object can easily have acceleration in an opposite direction to its velocity. Imagine a car slowing down by applying its brakes. The velocity is still forwards, but the change of velocity is negative because it is getting slower giving a negative acceleration, i.e.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work