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In this experiment I am going to find out the effect temperature has on a squash ball and how this effects how long it stays in the air for between the first and second bounce. This is a measure of its ability to bounce.

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Introduction

Squash Balls

Introduction

In this experiment I am going to find out the effect temperature has on a squash ball and how this effects how long it stays in the air for between the first and second bounce. This is a measure of its ability to bounce.

Theory

At the beginning of a squash match the players squeeze the ball and hit it against the wall repeatedly, this causes friction. They do this to warm the ball up so it will bounce better. The reason the ball bounces more when it’s warmer is because, as the ball warms up, the air molecules inside the ball move faster causing the internal pressure to go up. This makes the ball bigger and when it’s hit against the wall it will have more spring back rather than the wall absorbing the force because the stretched rubber casing has more elastic potential.

 Rubber casingimage09.pngimage00.png

 Air molecules, these molecules move faster when the temperature of the ball is higher, this can be linked to the kinetic theory, which tells us the higher the temperature the faster molecules will move, and will collide more often with more force.image01.png

When the ball is hot the air molecules inside the ball have a high collision rate between the air molecules inside the ball casing, the ball therefore expands. This causes the ball to have less give and bounce more.

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Middle

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Method

  1. Put 250ml of water in the beaker.
  2. Heat the beaker up until it reaches desired temperature.
  3. Put the ball in the water.
  4. Hold it under the water for five minutes at the constant temperature.
  5. Drop it from 100cm; the top of the 1m ruler.
  6. Using the stopwatch time how long the ball is in the air for between the first and second bounce.
  7. Do steps 2 – 5 twice more at the same temperature.

Fair Test

I will ensure my test is fair by dropping the ball on the same surface, from the same height and always use the same ball. The only thing I will change is the temperature.

Accurate

To make the test accurate I will drop the ball from each height three times and then take an average of the three drops, this should eliminate any freak results.

Number and Range

I chose to drop the squash ball at 20°C, 40°C, 60°C, 80°C and 100°C. I thought these were good temperatures at which to drop the ball because they’re evenly spaced out and cover a wide range. I didn’t choose to go up in 10’s because I thought this would be to close together for my experiment.

Safety

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Conclusion

The evidence I have collected does support my conclusion. But I could extend my experiment by using a lower temperature such as 0°C. Doing this would prove my theory because the molecules inside the ball would be moving slowly and therefore the ball would bounce very little or not at all.

Another way to extend my findings would be to use different squash balls; they come in different hardness’s. So if a harder ball was heated at 100°C it may bounce higher and stay in the air for longer.

I could prove the kinetic theory right in a different way; I could measure how high the ball bounces on its first bounce, this would confirm my findings.

My evidence is sufficient to support a firm conclusion because it shows the ball stays in the air for longer between the first and second bounce as the temperature goes up, this in turn supports my theory and proves my prediction correct.

Page  of                 Jon Cade

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