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What is Crime?

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Introduction

Jamal Al-Sarraf May 21, 2002 Sociology Mr. Finlay Crime is one of the aspects of human society that can't be changed. Since the dawn of time man has always committed crimes against society. Crime is what shows what a culture's values beliefs are, and how they react to certain "deviants" to their society. In order to fully understand how people live and work together, one must also examine the "deviants" of a particular society. Crime is what makes us human, without it there would be no such thing as a "society" because every person within in a society is somewhat of a "deviant". To fully understand what crime is and how it affects society one must examine why people commit crimes and for what reasons and how they can affect the society in which they live. Without crime, no society could exist, because all societies have deviants. Crime can relate to sociology in many ways. If one would look crime as a function it would clearly be labeled as a dysfunction because it goes against what society has branded as "good". ...read more.

Middle

A "deviant" might also want to change some features of their society in order to suit their own needs and wants. In order to do so they will openly defy the ruling body of their society in order to achieve this. The people who join the deviant are also labeled as deviants and criminals to their society. Usually, this people have an undying will to change their society. According to Herbert Spencer he "saw individualism and competition as the key to social progress." (Yahoo.com, Herbert Spencer). A famous "deviant" was Martin Luther King Jr. King wanted to change the laws in the United States in order to make equal rights for African-Americans living in the United States at that time. King tried many times without losing hope and he finally did change society, even after going through the troubles of being a "deviant' of his society. Such acts have always puzzled sociologists. A person would go through tremendous pain and suffering just to change an aspect of their society, or to just prove that they are "different" from their society and not like everybody else. ...read more.

Conclusion

Since it hurts one person and sometimes benefits anther person this is what makes people consider some actions of individuals as crimes. If these are considered crimes, one must think of social movements and other related characteristics. These are in somewhat of the grey area of what is considered a crime and what a crime isn't. In some societies social movements are a normal part of life, but in others they are considered as a radical extremists or "terrorists" because of their different beliefs and ideologies. Social movements can be treated as rebels in one society, but embraced in another society; it all depends on the society in which they are in. This is how criminology relates to sociology. In order to fully understand what crime is one must examine a number of sociological perspectives and viewpoints. Crime is in every society and can't be avoided, and must be studied to comprehend its affects. Without crime it is not possible for a society to exist, because there is no perfect utopian society to be found anywhere on this planet. Crime is what makes us human, "deviance" in society is healthy and it is needed in order for us to advance on into the future. ...read more.

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