• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Paul Marshall Commentary

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Commentary McEwan uses Paul Marshall's character to convey his implicit social class through the use of literary devices. McEwan exploits sentence structure to portray Paul Marshall's lack of accomplishment in his life, as he is able to illustrate all his success in a short rehearsed speech. Furthermore the elongated sentence also highlights his insecurities, as it portrays that Paul Marshall has rehearsed his speech thoroughly and there are no flaws or hesitation as he is speaking. The extended sentence may also emphasize a sense of urgency behind his words, as he doesn't wish to be interrupted. Paul Marshall owns a large company that manufactures chocolate "Amo." He is very proud of his company and as a result feels the need to flaunt his wealth. Moreover his speech provides a detailed and passionate account about his product. ...read more.

Middle

Paul Marshall further highlights he "hardly has the time to visit," this illustrates that his estate in "Clapham Common" is simply a luxury purchase rather than a necessity. When Paul Marshall is introduced to the Quincey children he is portrayed as a "tall man in white suit standing in the doorway." This depicts Paul Marshall to be the predominant figure in the room, even if the children haven't noticed him yet. The "white suit" is often an indicator of innocence however this would simply be an ironic statement. Paul Marshall is not the innocent character in the novel. Furthermore the "white suit" could also be another wealth indicator, as a black suit is normal the formality for the evenings. Paul Marshall wears a "white suit" because it is quite a suitable colour for the season and a suit is very formal attire, it shows importance. ...read more.

Conclusion

Perhaps it is more the label drop that boosts his ego. Paul Marshall's overall appearance exudes power and wealth. When he discusses "Hamlet" with Lola, he declares it "one of my favourites." He is able to utter the most common phrase from the play, without having actually seen the play. "He too had neither read nor seen the play," implies that appearances mean everything to him. Paul Marshall also needs to exploit his wealth in front of the children. Although he has not "read nor seen the play" he says he has just for appearances. Overall Paul Marshall's social class remains implicit, this is because although Paul believes in appearances, he only believes in appearances. In the short extracts we have read about him he presents himself in a manner that suggests he is from a wealthy social class, even in front of the children. However beneath his "appearance" there lies Paul Marshall from an unidentified social class. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Languages section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Languages essays

  1. Fasting Feasting by Anita Desai Detailed Study Notes

    The verb 'perched' also exerts a sense of a bird pouting its chest on a branch, hence adds on to the desperate artificiality. Before the wedding, last minute measures were taken. 'Mama stood behind her, securing the jasmines in her hand, and Aruna danced from one foot to the other...'

  2. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel Chapter Analysis

    shows the self-centred and somewhat arrogant girl within her. The lies she used before in the past also gives her a sly image, especially the mention of a lie that would "cover her with glory" (p129). Yet we must admit that she is smart in realising that "lying was a survival skill...

  1. Age of Innocence Commentary

    Newland says that May had gone as far as ridiculing "The Idyll's of the King", a cycle of twelve narrative poems by English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson; whose predominant scene is a character dying for love in a river bed.

  2. Christmas - origins, traditions and ideas for making gifts.

    Ko tu gaidi, vecais puisi, �ogad sievas nepanemis. Visas tavas vecas brutes saleku�as ciganos. Budeli, tevaini, tev gar� deguns: Visu galu sakari deguna gala. Saimeniece cisku kasa, negribeja galas dot. Vai tu kasi, vai nekasi, tapat gala japiedod! Budeli, tevaini, tev gara barda: Dod manam meitam istabu slaucit.

  1. English Commentary

    I woke up to what I was doing. I yanked on the rope. 'Let go of that lifebuoy, Richard Parker! Let go, I said. I don't want you here, do you understand? Go somewhere else. Leave me alone. Get lost. Drown! Drown!' He was kicking vigorously with his legs.

  2. Articles of VN War

    Ng�y 19-3-1965, Tuong Nguy�n Ch�nh Thi chu toa mot bu�i l� ngay tai b�n n�y c�u Hi�n Luong, sau b�i di�n van, Cao Minh Chi�n, T�n Th�t Duong Ky v� b�c si th� y Pham van Huy�n duoc d�n tu ph�a b�n n�y c�u, thuoc v�ng ch�nh phu VNCH, sang d�n giua c�u, giao cho Cong san H� Noi.

  1. Poetry Commentary on To His Coy Mistress

    Still asserting religious history, the speaker makes reference to the conversion of the Jews, as a way of affirming that his lover can refuse to have sex with him "till the conversion of the Jews" (L.10). Both of these religious references are not only a way of assuring his lover

  2. The Canonization - Commentary

    In addition, through the author's choice of words with rough, hard sounds that need to be stressed and forcefully said when spoken such as 'For God's sake, chide my palsy, ruined fortune', he is able to indirectly express the character's anger and annoyance as the sounds and words are associated with negative connotations.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work