• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Great Gatsby Commentary

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Greg 2/26/09 The Great Gatsby Commentary Chapter 3 Excerpt "G" is for "Gatsby", and also for "glamorous". The excerpt in question clearly depicts Gatsby's flamboyant lifestyle from the somewhat deprived lens of the narrator, whose name is unknown. Gatsby's image is further emblazoned with the innumerable infamous parties he regularly throws. Money and Glamour is what defines Gatsby's seemingly "great" character. Upon first glance, this seems like "the life," but under close, long-term scrutiny, it is clear that neither money nor glamour bring happiness. Albeit money being important to help us live, an increase in its inflow does not bring proportional happiness with it. The narrator makes it look as though everything seems to revolve around this deified Gatsby-from his Rolls-Royce, his swimming pool, his beach right down to a live orchestra playing under the stars. The narrator has obviously never met this Gatsby because he's observing him and his parties with great awe. ...read more.

Middle

People who are extremely flamboyant and over-concerned with appearances almost always end up having no real reason for doing anything in life. The purpose of the narrator is to set up a grand entrance for Gatsby by creating a sense of eminence as well as merit. He portrays him as the best there is-the cream of his crop-plain and simple. In the narrator's astounded eyes, Gatsby wakes up in the morning to release excellence. The excerpt has no theme; instead describes with great stalker-like detail Gatsby's lifestyle and eggstravagance (get it? West and East Egg?). Words like "dark gold," "full swing," "earth lurches away from the sun" imply a positive denotation that portrays the parties as absolutely fabulous. The language in question is successful in doing precisely what the narrator wants it to; it serves as a tool for him/her to convey Gatsby's character in great depths. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another slight reference to the time period is the mention of the "Follies," which was a well-known stage show during the Twenties. The Follies represented how a lot of young people behaved at that time: fun-loving, foolish and lacking sobriety. In the excerpt presented, the narrator's choice of words conveyed a great deal. The author wrote in a manner that any typical adult could understand and relate to. This suggests that the indented audience is the general public-people who are, or have known someone as extravagantly wasteful as Gatsby. The word choice created a tone that was highly critical-it gave the story a light-spirited feel. Throughout the vivid descriptions, the narrator used a wistful and slightly melancholic tone. Even though neither the reader nor the narrator have met Gatsby, the narrator sets up this out-of-this-world image of him leading the reader to believe that he is indeed "Great." In the readers' eyes, Gatsby is just another wasteful rich man, but to the narrator, Gatsby is the life of the party, the beacon of glamour, gold and ultimately hope. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate Languages section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate Languages essays

  1. Great Gatsby Ending Analysis

    But it never works, because "[inevitably] we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past".

  2. What makes Gatsby great?

    It is clear that the existence and nature of Gatsby's romantic dream has separated him from the "foul dust [that] floated in the wake of his dreams.", as put in Nick's words.

  1. A Comparison: Gatsby and Okonkwo

    Daisy was not this perfect specimen he had been working towards all these years, and that was what led him to his downfall into depression which was ended swiftly by Wilson. Okonkwo also was killed by his own false perception, as unknowingly his society's values were at odds with his own.

  2. A commentary on "THE GREAT GATSBY" by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    can be related to something that the reader may be familiar with. If similar sort of words are used to describe different situations or issues, the reader may not comprehend the situation well. The reader may think he understands the situation but the two situations may be very different from each other.

  1. An exploration of themes used to portray an image of society in The Great ...

    - Tom Buchanan could symbolize those who opposed the liberation of women ("making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand"). - Jordan Baker represents the 'modern woman'; she has a career ("sporting life") and is not dependant on a man.

  2. Self-determination in cocktail

    They do not want to admit the Aids as national problem, because it will affect the economy; the sex industry in Thailand will collapse. One of the senators even says that the right to live is only for good people and that bad people like patients with AIDS do not

  1. Great Gatsby Journals

    Gatsby thought that, because he held these parties and so many people came he was "famous" but, this was not the case. Nobody cared for Gatsby, they did not care, and all they did was take advantage of all his money and materialistic items that he provided.

  2. Commentary on Chapter 2 of 31 Songs by Nick Hornby

    'Thunder Road' knows how I feel and who I am, and that, in the end, is one of the consolations of art." (15) This idea means that the song 'Thunder Road' represents him because he was once a man whom was hopeless in life and he had a chance to

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work