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University Degree: Television & Radio Studies

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  1. The depiction of gender within sitcoms. For this study I have chosen to use the popular television series The Golden Girls.

    Many programmes tried to remove this stereotypes from viewer's minds, shows such as "Cagney & Lacey" and "Wonder Woman" made their bids to portray women in leading roles and in entirely different circumstances but unfortunately none were as successful at causing a stir on television like "The Golden Girls". The show aired in 1985 and featured three elderly ladies (Dorothy Zbornak, Blanche Deveraux and Rose Nylund) living together in a house on Miami Beach, they were then joined by a fourth member (Sophia Petrillo)

    • Word count: 1662
  2. Depiction of ethnic minorities within a family context. I hope to analyse the depiction of several racial identities within a family context on two highly popular British soap operas, Eastenders on BBC1 and Coronation Street on ITV1.

    British soap operas have become a necessity in everyday life to most of the population, soap operas connect viewers with realistic and dramatic lives on their television. They draw in on the viewers desire for connectivity to different people's lives and their problems, big and small. These desires are also referred to as "Social Realistic Conventions", (Livingston, S: Making Sense Of Television).

    • Word count: 1528
  3. With reference to several examples explain what is meant by TECHNOLOGICAL DETERMINISM and analyse its overall importance in the development of mass media products

    Progress, in particular, is the history of these inventions, which 'created the modern world'. The effects of these technologies, whether direct or indirect, foreseen or unforeseen, are as it were the rest of history" (Williams, 1990). Technological determinism is the idea that technology is an autonomous force within our lives. If this concept is accurate then we are presented with a matrix-like proposition of humans being the servants of new technology rather new technology serving us. This is not necessarily designed to be taken literally; it is not implying that we will all soon be at the mercy of some robotic task master.

    • Word count: 1842
  4. Explain how visual representations of children are informed by particular discourses of childhood.

    A way in which visual representations of childhood is depicted uses different discourses. A discourse uses no sets of beliefs about childhood; it creates a set of ideas and places children in groups in relation to other age groups. The social constructionist's approach is to use discourses when answering this question. There are two discourses of childhood that we can adhere to when answering the main question; these are the romantic discourse of childhood and the puritan discourse. The romantic discourse aims to protect a child's innocence; it views them as being wholesome and needing protection from the wide world.

    • Word count: 1490
  5. True Blood. True blood will be analyzed using a Christian ideology, exploring the value and themes in the context of this ideology.

    True blood will be analyzed using a Christian ideology, exploring the value and themes in the context of this ideology. In season one of True Blood the audience is slowly introduced to all the characters, many of these characters in are supernatural or have supernatural powers. The main character Sookie Stackhouse is a telepath; this ability allows her to hear other people's thoughts. Her love interest is Bill Comptone is a vampire, a creature that was once human but now is a 'living dead' with superhuman strength, speed, healing and mind control powers.

    • Word count: 1453
  6. Cours marketing

    solution ? Etape 1 : Sur le march� (analyse externe), sur l'entreprise (analyse interne) Etape 2 : Compte tenu de l'environnement, comment se situe l'entreprise ?, quel est le probl�me � r�soudre ?, comment le faire �voluer ? Analyse externe : * Indentification du march� : on recherche l'espace concurrentiel dans lequel se positionne l'entreprise (" march� pertinent ") Analyse du march� : objectifs : r�v�ler les faits marquants de la situation et les �volutions d'un march�. (Crit�re d'analyse : vente en volume vente en valeur, tendances d'�volution du march� global, des prix)

    • Word count: 1847
  7. NEW MEDIA AND OLD MEDIA

    Unlike in the past information is able to flow at a faster rate regardless of geographical location which was the case in the past because of telephony systems "which had been based upon circuit switching and geographically limited networks" (Flew:2005). Networking also develops as a result of network development as Holmes (2005: 184) argued "New media has the ability to connect like-minded others worldwide." In the new media network is decentralised unlike in the old media wherein it was centralised and controlled to promote the interest of those in control as Castells (1996 as cited by Flew:2005)

    • Word count: 1560
  8. representation of ethnic minorities in eastender

    Hobson says (2003:210) 'Soap opera is the perfect genre to educate, inform and entertain.... educating it's audience about a myriad of issues...' she continues, (2003:107) ' it has a never ending narrative form, which enables it to respond to nuances of change in the lives of it's characters as they reflect changes in society.' Normally the characters are very stereotyped which Goodwin and Whannel explains are, '...characters who conform to patterns of behaviour that are easily recognized and understood.' (1990:134).

    • Word count: 1925
  9. Evaluate Corwin(TM)s claim that Metallicas One(TM) illustrates Descartes(TM) conception of the interaction between mind and body

    Descartes is known today as the 'Father of modern philosophy', (Robinson and Garret 1999:5) 'Most of the great scientific thinkers of the 17th century were Christian believers.' (Robinson, 1999:18). While seeking true knowledge, Descartes writes his Six Meditations. In these Meditations, Descartes tries to develop a strong foundation, which all knowledge can be built upon. Descartes was fascinated with the mind-body dualism. The song 'One' evoked the very idea of this. Metallica's 'One' song is from the soundtrack of the movie 'Johnny Got His Gun', (Irwin, 2007:174)

    • Word count: 1642
  10. new media

    Therefore, as Doctor Vinod Vidwans coordinator of New Media at National Institute of Design argues in his work New Media, The Approach Document, "new media may be defined as an innovative media that generated experiences using all the possible divergent media, expertise and emerging technologies." (New Media, An Approach Document, 2004) Because technologies are in a continuous and rapid progress, the users of new media must have diverse skills not only in new technologies or emerging technologies but also in all traditional media techniques.

    • Word count: 1780
  11. Conversation Analysis

    The British Broadcasting Company (BBC) began its life as a private company in the December of 1922. It was granted a licence to begin broadcasting in the January of 1923. The company was founded predominantly by the radio equipment industry and practically at its conception found it was in dispute with the Post Office over Licence fees. Consumers were required to buy the licence, through the PO on purchasing a BBC wireless radio, but managed to evade payment by buying the cheaper"...experimenters' or home constructors' licences" (McDonnell 1991 p.10)

    • Word count: 1804
  12. Media and Music

    It is changing and growing due to file sharing over the Internet which now changes the balance between record companies, song writers and performing artists again with such peer-to-peer programs being used as Napster and LimeWire. Also being introduced to new music has never been easier with such websites as www.myspace.com where the possibilities of listening to new and different music are endless. The music industry consists of many elements that bring it together, this essay will be looking at a small part of it, in which you could say that this is one of the elements that the industry

    • Word count: 1871
  13. ANALYSE THE USE OF PERSUASIVE LANGUAGE IN PRINT ADVERTISEMENT.

    The language used in advertising is often described as 'loaded' (Cook, 1992). This is because every word that is used has been critically assessed to ensure that it connotes the desired meaning. For example, in the Coca-Cola advertisement a semantic field is created through the use of adjectives describing how refreshing the drink is, 'thirst' and 'frosty'. These examples are 'loaded' as they have a specific purpose, which is to persuade the consumer that this product will refresh and revive them.

    • Word count: 1369
  14. The Relationship between Television Comedy and Identity

    Fundamentally, this makes the viewer experience a thirty-minute cluster of the similar type of humour he/she would normally experience with friends and family. During the last decade, this has reached new heights with the popular American sit-com 'Friends' (1994-2004). Based around six 'twenty-something' characters, the show is fairly reliant on its representations of gender. The even mixture of three females and three males allows room for a range of gender based comical situations and dialogues. Male characters, Ross, Chandler and Joey are defined through masculinity, which is based on their strength and perception of women.

    • Word count: 1901
  15. What were the strengths and limitations of the BBC during the period 1922-1939?

    With the beginnings of the 'wireless' (the older name for radio) in the early 1920s, many of manufacturers had individually sought broadcasting permits from the Post Office, at that time the government overseeing public communications, and several were licensed on a temporary and local basis. They wished to broadcast in order to stimulate the sale of their wireless receivers, but the Post Office, fearing the technical problem that the lack of air waves, finally solved the problems of radio interference by persuading rival manufacturers to invest jointly in one small and initially speculative broadcasting station.

    • Word count: 1732
  16. Media, Power and Responsibility

    During the same period the IBA (Independent Broadcasting Authority) contracted a franchise to set up a British Satellite Broadcasting (BSB) service, however the service was repeatedly delayed, until it was beaten by Murdoch's Sky channel DBS launch. When the BSB service finally began transmitting it found it could never really compete with Sky TV's head start, as Murdoch had chosen to lease four transponders on the Astra Satellite he did not have the high set up costs of launching his own satellites that BSB had.

    • Word count: 1952
  17. Why is it important to study the media, rather then simply consume it?

    From the past to the modern world, it is very obvious that Media is still growing and thriving. "History, or rather the study of history, is often associated with lists of dates, successions of undeniable" (O'Sulllican, Dutton, and Rayner, 1994: 223). Year 1476, William Claxton Prints the first printed English book. Year 1785, The first issue of The Times is published (as the Daily Universal Register). Year 1896, The first moving picture show to a paying audience in London. Year 1936, BBC Television starts broadcasting.

    • Word count: 1323
  18. Evaluate the influences of the mass media on our lifestyles today using two sociological perspectives

    The Marxist theories of the mass media argue that the media do not only influence the public, but they also control them. Marxists say that the mass media promotes established values and conservative views. The media dose not promote change, it is controlled by the rich capitalists who own it. Basically the capitalist ruling class own and control the mass media to promote their own interests and continued wealth. Ralph Miliband's study, The State in Capitalist Society, gives an example of a Marxist approach.

    • Word count: 1725
  19. I have chosen to discuss in relation to the above question are "Peep Show" and "Eastenders." After watching episodes of both these programmes I have established thoughts and idea's on the characters, settings and dominant ideologies that have been given.

    It is thought that approximately sixteen million people watch every episode, making it one of the most watched television programmes in the country. Set in the East End of London, was thought the best place for the show to be filmed due to it's historical significance which is instantly recognisable to the audience. It is also illustrative of modern Britain, as we see multi-racial, larger than life characters. The programme is aimed at all ages of an audience, many families will watch this together.

    • Word count: 1148
  20. ''Children are dedicated consumers of television. A substantial part of their waking hours is spent in front of the box.'' (Hodge and Tripp 1996). What are the consequences of this constant exposure to television?

    In this essay I will look at the arguments against constant exposure to television with specific reference to Neil Postman and consider his theories in relevance to the consequences there may be for children. I will also look at contradictory evidence that denies that television contributes to the 'disappearance of childhood'2 and can with the right balance of exposure and quality of production help children in their learning. For this I will use sources from David Buckingham3, Barrie Gunter and Jill Mcateer.4 I am firstly going to look at how television has attracted this fear into the general public.

    • Word count: 1772
  21. MAS 104 - Australian Media

    Overweight, unashamedly sexual, loud, untidy and uninterested in the life of the mind, Sara-Marie emerged as the unlikely poster girl for youthful female confidence. Sara-Marie, having gone into the Big Brother house as an ordinary Perth girl with a down to earth charismatic appeal emerged to find an enormous following among young women and a newfound sense of Celebrity. Consequently Sara-Marie has written columns for the newspaper, recorded a song, produced a line of pyjamas and even written a top selling book.

    • Word count: 1749
  22. Discuss the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life

    the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meanings along with various adverse effects media studies might have on both people and society. One important approach to media studies focuses on the political perspective of media, which is genuinely linked to issues associated with politics, government and power relations where media play an influential role. Media industries are controlled by the government and regulated by censorship whereby dictatorial governments control the flow of information to the people and make rules of what can be accessed and publicised (James and Michael 1977:45).

    • Word count: 1983
  23. "Discuss the role of Media Studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life".

    Many individuals wake up to advertisements or the news on their radio, watch television or read the newspaper during breakfast, pass by billboards on the way to work or school, walk past posters on buildings and signposts, and even have advertising such as brands on their clothing. The media now has such an influence on individuals lives, that it now seems to go unnoticed, as most people don't know any other lifestyle. Generally, prior to becoming involved in media studies, many people think it simply involves analysing how the media can manipulate and delude others, simply to gain ratings and profit, however there is much more involved.

    • Word count: 1657
  24. Television Structure and Ownership.

    The toddler was becoming an adolescent. The knowledge of the companies that broadcast our programs is worrying, they know how many people are watching, what class, family numbers and many other useful pieces of information that help them sell advertising information. It isn't the broadcasters that research it but larger companies that get this information from questionnaires and a system called BARB. This has brought the television more customers than anything else, they know who is going to be home mid day and who gets home after 7 and have used intelligence to sell there programs.

    • Word count: 1187
  25. The two media conglomerates that I have chosen are Fox Broadcasting Company and PBS. I picked these two networks because they are as different as you can possibly get when it comes to television's basic broadcast channels.

    One of the reasons that Fox began to grow was that prime time hours were reduced, and no morning shows or soap operas were aired throughout the day. This gave Fox affiliates more flexibility in scheduling shows and commercial announcements. Their network shows began with shaky ratings, but by the end of the 1980's, they found shows to build on such as "Married With Children", "Beverly Hills 90210", and "The Simpsons." Fox tried to cater to younger, trend following viewers, and though slow to come around, this plan worked.

    • Word count: 1573

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life.

    "To conclude, I have discussed on the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life along with various effects media studies might have on both people and society. Indeed, people depend largely on media for information, images and entertainment of which they interpret and respond to their social environments. To a remarkable degree, we live in a media saturated milieu whereby our society is constituted by the media. Yet, there are consequences to consider when engaging in the study of media. Hence, it is vital to study the role of media studies in helping us to understand these aspects of society: political, economic and cultural in a comprehensive way."

  • Discuss the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life

    "To conclude, I have discussed on the role of media studies in making sense of the political, economic and cultural meaning of everyday life along with various effects media studies might have on both people and society. Indeed, people depend largely on media for information, images and entertainment of which they interpret and respond to their social environments. To a remarkable degree, we live in a media saturated milieu whereby our society is constituted by the media. Yet, there are consequences to consider when engaging in the study of media. Hence, it is vital to study the role of media studies in helping us to understand these aspects of society: political, economic and cultural in a comprehensive way."

  • Depiction of ethnic minorities within a family context. I hope to analyse the depiction of several racial identities within a family context on two highly popular British soap operas, Eastenders on BBC1 and Coronation Street on ITV1.

    "After carefully analysing both soaps, I would say Eastenders provides more in terms of diversity in its community, there are definite central plots aimed at a different minorities and although there are still elements of stereotypes within it, the show does not fail to deliver interesting storylines that are not only centred around white characters but other ethnics also. I find Coronation Street lacking in the understanding of modern society and also of the setting in which the show is based on. There is very little attempt to incorporate ethnicity within the plots and when there is a reference, it is a general stereotype based on what the director deems to be real life. It is a shame that a highly popular soap opera like Coronation has been running for so long and still has not abandoned the way television was viewed years ago, but instead retains its predominate white cast and settles for a strict type of audience with little allocation for anyone else. Several small changes could see more ethnic audiences taking notice of the show, but until these changes are made, the show's creators will find that, myself included more and more minorities will be watching it's biggest competitor, Eastenders. Sources . Sunday Mirror 2002 ("

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