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Who or what is responsible for Scrooge's change of character in 'A Christmas Carol'?

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Introduction

Transfer-Encoding: chunked Who or what is responsible for Scrooge's change of character in 'A Christmas Carol'? ?A Christmas carol? written by the Unitarian and well respected Charles Dickens narrates the novella of the dark and exploitative nature of man whom embodies the story's main character, Ebenezer Scrooge, renowned as a cantankerous and callous Industrialist of the Victorian era. He exercises his parsimonious, gluttonous ways on Christmas Eve and intentionally refuses Christmas festivity. Indeed, A Christmas Carol is a severe and scathing diatribe on the social conditions of the time and the nature of man that exploits those conditions. Dickens therefore employs the four ghosts as a necessary measure to redeem the compassionate full humanity, and restore harmony to society. Christmas is seen as the best season to revolve this revolution, as it is the time Christ was born, which is symbolic of new life, and therefore a restoration or ?rebirth? of Scrooge. This is done over a series of ghosts, each fundamental to reconnecting the time synapses of Scrooge?s life, and therefore allowing his redemption. Dickens uses onomatopoeia to describe Marley's dramatic entrance, "The cellar-door flew open with a booming sound." ...read more.

Middle

This therefore reinforces the idea that he was afraid of being vulnerable. The Cratchits are all appreciative for what they have, even though it is not much at all, 'feebly cried Hurrah' shows their gratefulness. The word ?feebly? is a connotation for inadequate, representing the unsubstantial food they survive off. Despite this, they cheer ?Hurrah?, portraying how they are grateful for still being a family ? this was a luxury, as many families were separated as a result of the Poor Laws, which only offered the workhouses, a horrible institution for people convicted for being in debt. 'Nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family' tells us that they understand what situation they are in and do not question it. The word ?small? also references not only the inadequate portions, but also is used to reference there insignificance in society, as the rock bottom of the social hierarchy. This is also demonstrated by the name ?Tiny Tim? which shows the insignificance he possesses. The fact Scrooge can save him, and has always ignored the family?s desperation also reinforces this. However, Scrooge wants reassurance that Tiny Tim will definitely live, 'tell me if Tiny Tim will live? after seeing the family?s dire need for help, and their situation. ...read more.

Conclusion

This phrase could suggest Scrooges lack of physiological understanding of the value of life, and his distorted mind set ?too dark to be observed?. In conclusion, the book is clearly a social commentary, as demonstrated to have been written to reflect the autobiographical experience and suffering of the author with the intent of suggesting to readers the need to reform the social system which had sprung up around them. The association with Christmas is ironic in that people have come to think of A Christmas Carol as a story about the Christmas spirit when it really embodies a tale of the universal human spirit which needs to be recovered, and which the protagonist Scrooge, the embodiment of the ills of contemporary society of Dickens, recovered through the character catharsis concluding the character arc driving the action of the story thereof. The most affective Ghost in my opinion was the Ghost of Christmas Past, as it catalysed the initial road to redemption for Scrooge, as by the end of the three phantoms, he had already shown change in character. The Ghost of Christmas Past makes him relive the errors and shame of his youth, and causes him to regret the way he treated his true love, which built the fundamental foundation for his quick revolution and his motivation to change his ways. ...read more.

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