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Consider the use of first person narrative in Frankenstein and at least one other Gothic text.

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Introduction

Consider the use of first person narrative in Frankenstein and at least one other Gothic text. Frankenstein makes liberal use of first person narrative to verbally illustrate the text in a number of ways. Through doing this, it aims to show a hidden depth to the inner workings of the mind of the narrator, it can make a scene more dramatic, it can allow the reader to more fully relate with the events of the text, or it can just be to make it have a more surreal effect on the reader if there is something unusual about the narrator. Certainly in Dracula, the other Gothic text I have chosen to analyse, is this the case. Both Frankenstein and Dracula use this technique although obviously in different ways, and because both texts can be considered similar to each other in a number of ways, it can be difficult to fully recognise the differences between the uses of this technique and indeed the reasons for these variations. The first, primary difference is the different tenses in which the first person narrative feature is used. Dracula is more likely to include a phrase such as 'I ventured...' or 'I heard' both of which are in the past tense, whereas in Frankenstein, due to the text not being written up as many documents to give evidence (actually more like a narrative prose) ...read more.

Middle

The inner workings of Victor's mind are indeed exposed because although he recognises the ill effects on his health of his obsession, 'my cheek had grown pale with study', he continued to remain working obsessively in isolation, cut off from anyone, even ordinary contact with the living, with 'unremitting ardour'. This description gives us a small glance into the turmoil that must be going on inside his head, and would be comparable in Dracula to the inner thoughts of the Count himself. The inner thoughts of the characters are wanted enough that in a way first person narrative would be exceedingly useful throughout the novel, although it is not used solely for that purpose, but also to provide a greater sense of drama and tension. The fear and emotion in Victor's mind, not merely his voice, can be detected not just by the direct statement of the emotion that he is feeling, but also by roundabout ways of describing something. When someone is afraid, they don't speak concisely, but will over-elaborate, go into greater detail than needed, and more often than not go off on a complete tangent. The dream that Victor experiences about Elizabeth can be seen in some way as a tangent, because it is not directly related to the creature that he has created, but instead is just something rather ...read more.

Conclusion

It is similar to when Lucy writes first hand after having been bitten by Dracula, and writes about the gaps in her memories, and how kind everyone is. This is because to read about events from the perspective of someone whose mind is not normal, but instead when there is something else, something dark deep down, it can be very revealing and shocking to read about. In the final scenes of both Frankenstein and Dracula, the respective authors succeed in making it much more dramatic than it would have been otherwise by using first person narrative, because then everything is described in less floral language, and instead simply using ordinary words that would have either cropped up in day to day conversation, or using whatever came to mind when the event happened. Overall, in Frankenstein and Dracula, first person narrative sets out to achieve a number of objectives, and I feel succeeds in these. Through this technique, it becomes much more dramatic by letting the sentences become more concise, it gives us a hidden view to the mind of the characters, and allows the reader to become more directly involved with the events of these novels. Although this technique cannot and should not be used all the time, when used in the right ways, it can help with making the novels more enjoyable to read and makes them seem to be better works of literature in general. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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