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George Bush Speech Analysis. This speech was given by former U.S. President, George Bush, in the city of New Orleans, regarding the devastating occurrence of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

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Introduction

This speech was given by former U.S. President, George Bush, in the city of New Orleans, regarding the devastating occurrence of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He delivered the speech from the area most affected by the storm (New Orleans), which gives his speech a deeper and more meaningful effect to the people of the United States, especially those from New Orleans. His purpose was to bring unity and hope to those people suffering the consequences of the hurricane and this objective was achieved. The key demographics of the speech are those affected by the hurricane, the live audience, which are those present in the mist of the destruction in New Orleans. The external audience is the mass media, the public and for the rest of those whom it may concern. ...read more.

Middle

Lastly, former President Bush reassured the audience of hope, by drawing their attention to former issues. For example, the terrible winters at Jamestown and Plymouth, the rebuilding of Chicago after a great fire and the earthquake in San Francisco. All of which George claimed to say, that we've "...never left out destiny to the whims of nature, and we will not start now." This also refers back to the idea of unity, which is elaborated on immensely in the speech, that we Americans have survived these disasters as well, therefore it will be hard but there will be a brighter future. In this speech there was no direct use of imagery in the text, however it is not needed because ironically the live audience was standing in the midst of the destruction. Though language features in this speech were few and far between. ...read more.

Conclusion

etc. Bush used two descriptive words in everything that he was describing to make the situation clearer and more understandable for the nation. Also, throughout this speech, Bush never really used any difficult words that could possibly be misunderstood by the public. This shows that he wanted his speech to be understood and comprehended by all of the nation, and also for everyone to understand the seriousness of the disaster at hand. In conclusion, Bush's speech was very motivational to all of America. His main objective was to assess the disaster, and approach the things that needed to be done as a whole. He delivered it with a rather simple vocabulary so that all of his audience could easily understand the problem and what had to be done to bring the nation back together. Bush wanted to unify all, be sure to have Americans come together as one, and to get everyone through the horrible catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina. ...read more.

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