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How does Blanche control the agenda and conversation in this dialogue? (Scene 6 pg 68-72, A Streetcar Named Desire)

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How does Blanche control the agenda and conversation in this dialogue? (Scene 6 pg 68-72) Blanche very much so leads the conversation between her and Mitch. She speaks in an imperative tone towards him, stating that she ?wants you to have a drink!?. This portrays how she is in control and can divert the issue of whether she ?wants a drink??, by playing the role of the hostess. She insists they have a drink because despite Blanche wanting one, she will not have a drink unless Mitch does so too, and so she manages to hide her weakness and need to drink by demanding that Mitch joins her. Blanche guides the conversation by asking questions because she knows that Mitch is inclined to answer. She asks ?Why should you be so doubtful?? in the hope that Mitch will answer in a way that she desires to make her feel wanted. Blanche is careful to guide the conversation around the agenda she wishes to speak about, for example when she speaks of ?the kiss I objected to?, it makes her feel dominant in comparison to Mitch, and desired. ...read more.


Blanche has over the conversation because of her ability to interrupt him, and then submit him to a long explanatory dialogue, as if to make sure she conveys her point. Blanche is portrayed as the dominant character between her and Mitch, as the stage directions describe how she ?precedes him into the kitchen?. This shows how she leads into the kitchen and he follows, which reinforces the connotations of Mitch being like her dog, or a lost puppy who is eager for love and affection from a woman. This idea that Mitch is not the alpha male in their relationship (in comparison to Stanley in his and Stella?s relationship), is reinforced when he ?stands awkwardly behind her?. As a reader we see that Mitch never feels completely comfortable around Blanche, such as earlier in the play when he gives an ?embarrassed laugh? and ?coughs a little shyly? around her. This can be juxtaposed with how Blanche confidently flirts around him and slips on ?the dark red satin wrapper? which could be interpreted as quite promiscuous, and suggests that it is Blanche who is the dominant and controlling figure in their relationship. ...read more.


Blanche asks ?Voulez-vous couches avec moi ce soir? Vous ne comprenez pas? Ah, quell dommage!? which is translated to ?would you like to sleep with me tonight? You don?t understand? Ah, what a pity!?. This portrays how Blanche teases Mitch because she is certain that he won?t understand. This shows how Blanche is in control because it emphasises their differences and makes Blanche seem like the well ?cultured? woman she tries to suggest she is. Up to this point in the scene, Blanche has been very ladylike and proper, and this dialogue is an insight into how it?s as if her past is catching up with her and she couldn?t resist being promiscuous and asking for sex. The way she changes the meaning of the French And pretends she was talking about finding ?some liquor? shows how she can deceive Mitch. This highlights the dichotomy of Blanche ? there are many different sides to her whereby she can be flirtatious and promiscuous and proper and ladylike, later asking him to ?unhand me, sir.? ...read more.

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