• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Levels of development affect the ability to manage natural hazards. Discuss this statement in relation to two types of natural hazards. A natural hazard is an event that occurs without the influence of man

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Levels of development affect the ability to manage natural hazards. Discuss this statement in relation to two types of natural hazards. A natural hazard is an event that occurs without the influence of man. It is an event which contains a level of possible danger. Examples of natural hazards are those such as hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Development and levels of development are locations where the state of developing (expanding) is taking place. Where a city or town is expanding and building more buildings and structural locations. The management of an event is the way in which the event itself is controlled. The two types of natural hazards that I will be discussing in relation to levels of development are hurricanes and earthquakes. ...read more.

Middle

Another example of where the levels of development affected the ability to manage a hurricane is Hurricane Wilma when it struck Mexico. As the country is a holiday destination for many, it is developed to attract tourist and not to survive against natural hazards such as hurricanes. As it is built to attract tourist, at the time when the hurricane struck Mexico, many tourist were in the country although they were able to get to a safe location as the Mexican government and the tourist themselves knew about the hurricane. The countries level of development makes it hard for people and the cities to manage hurricanes as they are not developed or designed to manage natural hazards. Levels of development also affect the ability to manage an earthquake, although the development of the buildings maybe able to be managed. ...read more.

Conclusion

The bridge is designed so that when an earthquake takes place, the bridge rises to avoid crumbling like the buildings and the land around it and once the earthquake is over, it lowers itself to its normal position, although this is difficult. As not many earthquakes have occurred since this was designed, it is hard to tell whether or not the design will work or not. Levels of development affect the ability to manage natural hazards as the design and development of a building or structure can help saves lives as well cause the building or structure not to collapse. This is all dependent on the way a building is designed and made. Levels of development can also affect the ability to manage natural hazards as the more developed a place it, the hard it is to manage a natural hazard in that particular location unlike a location that is not as developed. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hazardous Environments section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hazardous Environments essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The number of fatalities that result from volcanic and seismic natural hazards is related ...

    4 star(s)

    to the geography of the land and heat and gas emissions (these methods are illustrated in figure 4). To protect the population, actions to reduce possible damage and instruct people on what precautions are thought to be necessary must be taken.

  2. "The Impacts of Natural Hazards include Social, Economic and environmental effects" Discuss this statement ...

    With so many dead and injured some farms had a shortage of labour. This in turn lead to a lower crop yield that reduces the revenue made from farming. The main environmental damage done by the landslide was the destruction of ancient tropical forests.

  1. What is an environmental (natural) hazard?

    very stable and there is little activity here * Plates move in one of three directions - towards each other (convergent), away from each other (divergent) or past each other (conservative) * Earthquakes are commonly found at convergent and conservative plate boundaries * Volcanoes are commonly found at divergent plate

  2. "Poor countries are more at risk from natural hazards than rich countries" How far ...

    Short-term impacts are the direct impacts caused by the event such as flooding, loss of life, damage to buildings or infrastructure. Long-term impacts are more indirect and are related to factors such as disease, future farming prospects or rebuilding damaged areas.

  1. comparing shrewsbury an old town an telfrd a purpose build new town

    I will create a pedestrian count to compare the amount of people visiting Shrewsbury and Telford. In Shrewsbury we conducted three pedestrian counts, one in the Pride Hill shopping centre at 10:17 am at this spot we had a total of 140 people pass by in ten minutes, we conducted

  2. California and the Phillippines - Hazard Hotspots and Human Management of Risks

    This approach is also followed in California and has proved to be very successful. Furthermore, under the ?Hyogo Framework for Action?, this has been discussed that every disaster should have a disaster management plan. So people know hat exactly should be done during an earthquake.

  1. To what extent is magnitude the main factor to influence the type and level ...

    Meaning countries and tourists could do nothing but wait. This shows that Magnitude is not always the main factor as it has barely any effect on this hazard and it?s sometimes its due to various other factors. So, in some cases the main factor varies and is not always magnitude.

  2. Volcanic and seismic events are major pieces of evidence towards proving that plate-tectonics theory ...

    What is the Curie point and why is it important? When magma cools, the magnetic iron-bearing minerals align themselves with Earth’s magnetic ï¬eld, recording both its direction and its strength. The temperature at which iron-bearing minerals gain their magnetization is called the Curie point.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work