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The Development of the Travel and Tourism Industry After World War II

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Introduction

The Development of the Travel and Tourism Industry After World War II Travel & Tourism The development of the Industry after the Second World War "Travel and Tourism is not one activity, but a series of industry sectors linked by the common aim of serving the travel needs of people around the world and defined by the world and defined but the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) as: The economic activities associated with travel as measured by the wide variety of current and capital expenditures made by or for the benefit of the traveller before, during and after the trip. Changing Socio-economic circumstances Since the Second World War the Travel and Tourism Industry has developed. The main factors that have led to the growth and socio-economic circumstances of the Travel and Tourism Industry are: * Increase in Car Ownership The greatest single transport factor that has increased for travel and tourism is the car ownership. There was an increase in the number of cars on the road between 1951 and 1970 and an even bigger increase between 1951 and mid 1990's. Increased car ownership has now been a major factor of visits to tourist's attractions and leisure facilities. This shows how car ownership has increased over the years. * Increase in Leisure time People now don't have to work as much so more time to have holidays in the UK and abroad so more times to go on holiday. In the 1950's the average working week was 50 hours but now the typical hours in a normal working week ranges from 37 - 40 hours. * More disposable income and paid holiday People now have more money to spend on holidays from two incomes in a family and go on more holidays. Also people now are paid for there time off from work and use this to on holiday home and abroad. ...read more.

Middle

The positive are: Many jobs are made in the tourism business e.g. in restaurants, hotels, shops etc. Also the owners of the shops and restaurants make quite a lot of money from tourists visiting and money in the country improves the country's appearance because they have the money to improve buildings etc. The more visitors the more well known it gets and people will travel there and is known as a place to visit. The negative are: Even though many jobs are produced through the tourism industry most jobs are seasonal so people working in hot countries e.g. Spain after about October when it's colder and no tourist there's then no work till the summer again. Also for the winter ski holidays. Shops and restaurants also lose business through problems like war and diseases so people don't travel to dangerous countries so the owners lose the money. Another negative impact is how countries can get destroyed e.g. Falaraki has had many problems with loads of young people up all night drinking. Also there have been cases of British people being arrested and even raped over the last couple of years. Task 2 Components The components to make up the structure of the Travel and Tourism Industry are: A tourist attraction is the place where tourist would go to visit e.g. Alton Towers theme park. Blackpool Beach Transport is then needed for how to reach the tourist attraction e.g. by car, train etc Accommodation is not always needed as some tourist attractions could just to visit for a day but if needed hotels, caravans etc Tour Operators then put a package together using the attraction visiting, the transport and accommodation and then put it in travel agents or a direct sell to the customer and cuts out the travel agent. Travel Agents then sell the holidays in brochures in many shops all over the UK. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Business deal with the big companies like American Express and sort out business travel with the company for business trips that need to be dealt with. These types of travel agents are in offices and not in a shop. * Also the same for call centres there in offices not in shops. Customers then phone up to book a holiday instead of going into a travel agent e.g. Cresta Tourism Development A tourist board is where people can go for information about an area they would like to know about to go and visit. They can then ring up and ask about the area. In a tourist information centre they can get leaflets and other information about the area. The tourist information centres are there to promote the area and show what it has to offer. Tourist information boards are also there to: � To promote or undertake publicity in any form; � To provide advise and information services; � To promote or undertake research; � To establish committees to advise them in the performance of their Functions Blue Badge Guides are trained up to take individuals or groups around the region for tours of the area for visitors. You can identify the guide by them wearing a blue badge Task 3 All organizations belong either to the voluntary, public or the private sectors. � Private The private sector is companies like Thomson and British Airways who are making a profit and increase sales. They make their money selling their products and this is where they make their money. There are shareholders in this sector and usually twice a year receives divident so more shares more divident. If no profit is made the shareholders get no money back. � Voluntary Voluntary makes their money from visitors, memberships, sponsorships and donations. These are places like the National Trusts who protect lands, buildings and buy new sites using the money from the money collected. They have stakeholders who wouldn't have money from the profits but have their companies advertising and special deals. ...read more.

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