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The Growth of Dubai

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Growth of Dubai Contents Contents 1 Geographical Location of Dubai 2 Map Showing UAE and the Arabian Peninsular 3 Map Showing Dubai and the UAE - see attached map 3 Historical Background of Dubai 3 Map Showing the Original Settlement 4 The Growth of Dubai 5 Graph Showing Population from 1900-2000 - see attached graph 6 Pattern of Growth and Reasons 6 Map Showing the Growth of Built-up Areas 8 Foreign Workers in Dubai 9 Table of Immigrant Workers 10 Bar Graph to follow on from table 11 World Map Showing Worker Origins - see attached map 11 Dubai Time-line 12 12 Dubai's Economy 13 Dubai Main Economic Indicators 13 Dubai's Economic Functions 14 Pie Chart Showing Key Economic Sectors 14 Dubai Economic Structure 2001 15 Geographical Location of Dubai Dubai is situated in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where it is the second largest emirate with an area of 3,885 square kilometres. The UAE is situated along the south-eastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula between 22.5� and 26� N and between 51� and 56.25� E. Qatar lies to the west and north-west, Saudi Arabia to the west and south and Oman to the north, east and south-east. The total area of the UAE is about 83,600 square kilometres, much of it in Abu Dhabi emirate. Map Showing the Arabian Peninsular and the Middle East Map Showing UAE and the Arabian Peninsular Map Showing Dubai and the UAE - ...read more.

Middle

Japanese cultured pearls, and by the drop in trade in the Second World War, but Dubai survived through its merchant skills and the ability to profit from trading with Persia and India after WWII. Also the two long rules of H.H. Shaikh Saeed Bin Maktoum from 1912 to 1958, and his son, H.H. Shaikh Rashid Bin Saeed al-Maktoum, and their business and political foresight helped to stabilise the economy. In the 1950s the creek began to silt up and H.H. Sheikh Rashid decided to have the waterway dredged. It was an ambitious and costly project but it strengthened Dubai's position as a major trading and export port. Sheikh Rashid realized what was necessary to transform Dubai into the cosmopolitan, prosperous city it is today. Sheikh Rashid along with Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan is recognized as playing a key role in establishing the federation of the United Arab Emirates. The discovery of oil in the 1960s helped this development, but Dubai oil revenues have never been as big as those in Abu Dhabi, so Dubai's growth has always depended partly on business skill. When oil was discovered in 1966, Sheikh Rashid used the oil revenues to encourage development in Dubai, schools, hospitals, roads, a modern telecommunications network, a new port and terminal building were built at Dubai International Airport, and largest man-made harbour in the world was constructed at Jebel Ali, and a free zone was created around the port. ...read more.

Conclusion

Activities such as trade, transport, tourism, industry and finance have shown steady growth and helped the economy to achieve a high degree of expansion and diversification. Dubai Main Economic Indicators Source: Dept Economic Development 2001 Particular 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Population (Thousands) 757.0 805.0 857.0 862.4 910.0 GDP Dhs. millions - current price 47,879 49,876 55,810 62,335 64,290 GDP* Dhs. millions - Constant price 46,599 48,208 52,150 57,075 59,382 Consumer Price Index 135.5 137.7 141.5 143.0 113.0 Ports Cargo Handled / Million Ton 35.6 36.4 39.7 44.3 50.2 No. of Containers/ Millions 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.5 Air Cargo/Thousand Ton 414.6 431.8 474.8 562.6 610.0 Hotel Guests - Millions 1.8 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.1 Total Employees (Thousands) 431.5 457.2 517.0 549.4 594.2 Total Non-Oil Trade (Millions) 85,846 88,770 85,764 95,513 111,671 Imports(Millions) 63,726 67,612 65,605 72,392 83,187 Exports(Millions) 5,473 5,241 5,128 5,462 5,909 Re-exports(Millions) 16,647 15,817 15,031 17,659 22,575 * GDP Gross Domestic Product Dubai's Economic Functions Dubai has a number of Functions. The table below shows the percentage of the population employed in the various "Economic Sectors". Rank Economic Sector Employment % 1. Trade 21 2. Other services 20 3. Construction 18 4. Manufacturing 13 5. Government services 10 6. Transport, Storage and communication 9 7. Restaurant & Hotels 6 8. Agriculture & quarrying 2 9. Oil 1 Pie Chart Showing Key Economic Sectors Dubai Economic Structure 2001 Trade 16.4 Manufacturing 16.1 Transport 13.3 Finance 11.0 Real estate 9.8 Government 9.2 Oil sector 8.5 Construction 8.1 Other 7.6 Source: Dept Economic Development 2001 ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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