• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The hazards presented by volcanic and seismic events have the greatest impact on the worlds poorest people

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Hazards are anything that could cause damage to humans or buildings. Many volcanic and seismic events happen that cause hazards to humans. Often the world's poorest people are hit the worst; however wealthier countries can also be adversely affected. The Kobe earthquake in Japan 1995 struck at 5.45am. Many people were asleep in bed, causing the hazard to be increased because the people were unaware. Although many Japanese buildings were of aseismic design, the roofs of their houses were designed to withstand typhoons and so were very heavy. When the earthquake struck many people were crushed in their sleep. Also every year on 1st September Japan has national earthquake preparedness day to remember the 140000 that died in the Tokyo earthquake of 1923 but this did not help many of the citizens of Kobe. The Kobe earthquake was also in December so many people had nowhere to go in the middle of the night in winter and the risk of hyperthermia was extremely high. ...read more.

Middle

Approximately 6000 schoolchildren died. This loss is exacerbated by the Chinese one child policy and will impact upon the community for a long time. Although the region being very poor was extremely devastated when the earthquake struck, the steep topography of the area exacerbated the problems because it caused mass movement which killed 158 rescue workers and blocked many of the roads that aid workers were trying to use to get to the people. The Chinese government are now relocating many of the people from the area because it is unsafe - some say it is too late. The 2004 Boxing Day tsunami affected many people with over 350000 killed. Indonesia, Sumatra and the Nicobar Islands were badly affected. The poorest people were the worst affected by the disaster because there was no warning and many did not know that there was that type of hazard. However there has been a tsunami warning system in the Pacific Ocean since the 1940s - this is because the wealthier countries like Japan, Canada and USA all are affected by the Pacific. ...read more.

Conclusion

The eruptions also provide extremely fertile soils for agriculture and native species. Therefore the hazards presented by volcanic and seismic events do have a huge impact on the world's poorest people, yet some of the wealthiest can suffer just as badly. Often the world's poorest people live in very high population density housing areas on marginal land meaning that they are at an increased risk of the hazard than the wealthier on more stable land. The very poorest in Indonesia during the tsunami were on the very edge of the coast closest to the impact zone, whereas the wealthier people were generally further inland and more safe. The secondary effects of the seismic or volcanic activity can be just as devastating as the original event, for example, many homes that were not destroyed after the Mount St Helens eruption of 1980 in Washington state were washed away by the flooding from the rivers and Spirit Lake becoming blocked from debris. Therefore, the world's poorest people do tend to suffer the most but mainly from a lack of education and prior knowledge of the dangers. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hazardous Environments section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hazardous Environments essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The number of fatalities that result from volcanic and seismic natural hazards is related ...

    4 star(s)

    Bam a city in south-eastern Iran (an LEDC) and the surrounding Kerman province, was hit by an earthquake measuring 6.6 on the Richter scale (plate boundaries related to Iran are shown in figure 8) on December 26th, 2003 resulting in the deaths of over 43,000 people and leaving over 60,000 people homeless.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    The hazards presented by volcanic activity have the greatest impact on the poorest members ...

    3 star(s)

    Plymouth remains uninhabitable, and many of the poorer inhabitants have had to move to other nearby Caribbean islands, such as Antigua (GNI $13,170) and Jamaica (GNI $4,800). This may seem like an improvement, but with little money remaining once their homes were gone, Montserrat's migrants were then classed as some

  1. Peer reviewed

    In December's tsunami in the Indian Ocean, an estimated 250,000-300,000 people were killed or ...

    4 star(s)

    In their paper Professor McCloskey and colleagues said that 'our results indicate unambiguously that there is a real danger of another earthquake in the region. It is vital that disaster fatigue does not delay the implementation of the Indian Ocean Tsunami warning system.'"

  2. "What are hazardous Environments and how can hazards be classified?"

    Events such as Earthquakes or Flash floods are examples and are classified as "Rapid Onset Hazards" "Creeping Hazards" are hazards that take place over a long period of time. For example droughts, these can last for a period of up to 10 years or so.

  1. Mount St. Helens - Natural disasters.

    as 22 occurred within one 8 hour period (the total number of earthquakes larger than magnitude 4.0 was 25). As of 1PM earthquakes occurred so frequently that the record for seismic station SHW became saturated. Individual earthquakes with a magnitude less than 3.5 were lost due to the continuous traces of larger ones.

  2. The Kobe Earthquake

    The worst industrial damage occurred at or near the waterfront due to ground failures-melting, lateral spreading, and settlement. [image025.jpg] [image026.jpg] Kobe earthquake Northridge earthquake The Port of Kobe was an extreme example of the problems associated with poor soils in areas prone to earthquakes.

  1. Earthquakes: Why do some places suffer more than others?

    the collapse of many such houses in Kobe, Japan in 1995 that led to the high death toll of over 6,300.

  2. Volcanic and seismic events are major pieces of evidence towards proving that plate-tectonics theory ...

    In South America and Africa there are very thick glacial deposits of the same age (Permian-Carboniferous). The deposits match almost exactly when the continents are moved back together. As glacial ice moves, it cuts grooves and scratches in underlying rocks and produces folds and wrinkles in soft sediments.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work