• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The social and economic advantages and disadvantages of limestone quarrying and it's use

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The social and economic advantages and disadvantages of limestone quarrying and it's use Limestone is one of the UK's main produces and due to the hills and mountains which are made almost solely from limestone the UK quarrying industry is one of the most successful and consistent in the world. Limestone, and its products quicklime and slacked lime have, in recent years become some of the most invaluable natural resources available to today's manufacturing market. Not only are they used in many building materials such as cement, road ballast, or for sculptures, but also they have become a common additive to many more obscure or unexpected products, for example it is used in glass; as a thickener in many fabrics; in make-up and even bread. The fact is that the demand for limestone has become so great that the UK limestone production currently stands at about 2.5 million tonnes a year. ...read more.

Middle

One of the main complaints about limestone quarrying has been, that as it tends to be in more rural areas the small villages and towns surrounding the quarry, have not only lost a beautiful view but have also been bombarded and clogged up with large, dusty, noisy lorries carrying limestone from the quarry. Many people feel that the quarries are unnecessarily loud and obtrusive, feeling that their quality of life has been severely lowered due to noise pollution and the blatant disregard for their opinions where the quarries are concerned. However the quarries also offer many, well paid, local jobs to the people of the surrounding towns and villages, serving to effectively boost the economy and lower the number of unemployed people in these areas. Also because of the size of the lorries new ones, to accommodate for their wide, heavy loads, have replaced many of the original roads in villages and towns surrounding the quarries. ...read more.

Conclusion

So that, therefore, eventually the purpose and need of limestone quarrying would be and could be, surpassed by the inevitable advances in our knowledge. And although this is not an immediate solution to a large problem facing us, we must bear in mind that if we were to suddenly eradicate it's use within companies products and projects we would face much more serious problems. Not only in the form of our economy, but also, in part, as consumers we would be suddenly deprived of many limestone based products. I therefore conclude my essay on this final note that although there is, at presents no immediate solution to the quarries. We must learn to realise that there is no alternative at the moment, and people who are apposed should see through their naivety and realise that a quarry is not a permanent fixture and that if it is not within sight of their village then it will be in sight of another. Daisy Cox 10PDS ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Rocks & Weathering section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Rocks & Weathering essays

  1. Soil is a product of its natural environment and the ways in which humans ...

    This can encourage mass movement and land slides. The more gentle the slope, the slower the rate of water and water clogging, and there is little risk of soil erosion, but the risk of weathering is greatly increased. At the base of the slope, thick soils can be found.

  2. What Really Happened at Pompeii on 24th August AD79?

    This was probably due to it being pushed by a rising current and then, on this ceasing or being overcome by the weight, spreading itself out. In some parts it was white and in others black and dirty because of the earth and ash it contained.'

  1. Determining the paleoenviroment and tectonic history of a small area (Cocklawburn Beach)

    Bed 23:This is a layer of fine-grained sandstone. It is 1.25 metres thick and has evidence of calcite deposits; these were probably formed as calcite formed round particles of mud or clay. Bed 24: This bed is 1.25 metres thick.

  2. 'I think that sedimentary stones will be more affected by weathering than igneous stones.' ...

    - In terms of data collection, I thought that due to my planning my table was well thought-out and served its purpose very well, although the ink did run in the rain slightly. The only things I would have liked to have improved about my data collection, are that I

  1. I am trying to find out how footpath erosion on Pen Y Fan which ...

    from one bank to the other and then measuring the depth from the tape measure to the ground using the ruler every 10 cm. Other data that might have been useful would be to measure the erosion around the footpath to see whether the walkers might have found the path

  2. Compare and Contrast the Weathering Found in an Area of Limestone Country with that ...

    Caverns may collapse when the roof is worn away either by erosion or carbonation and solution leaving gorges, which are common in limestone landscapes. The collapse exposes the underground streams that are surrounded by steep walls. Dry valleys occur and are a feature of limestone landscapes.

  1. Investigate the relationship between the solid geology and the physical landscape from Ingleton to ...

    The River Twiss therefore tumbles over the steps of the sandstone, while the plunge pools have been eroded from the slate. It was found that the vegetation changed above Pecca Bridge from typical limestone woodland to that associated with more acidic conditions to an environment of bracken and heather which

  2. Find out why there is no Carboniferous Limestone visible around the Somerset area.

    They concluded that some of this may have contributed to the Limestone content in the Budleigh Salterton Pebble Beds. This provides evidence that the Carboniferous Limestone must have been deposited, as there is evidence that the pebble beds were formed from the erosion of this Limestone.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work