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Explain why the prospects for the survival of the new democratic regime were not great in Weimar Germany?

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Introduction

´╗┐Explain why the prospects for the survival of the new democratic regime were not great? The prospects for the survival of the new democratic regime were not great. There are many equally important factors that contributed to the unstable nature of Germany around the time the Weimar constitution was agreed in 1919. Such actors included the structure of the Weimar regime, the burden of World War I and the onset of the economic malaise, all of these factors were significant in contributing to an unstable start for the Weimar Regime, thus the prospects for the survival of the new democratic regime were not great. One significant factor that hindered the prospects of the new democratic regime was the burden of World War I. The defeat of Germany in World War I was a bitter blow for Germany. The burden of World War I undermined the government because it weakened their political stance as a result of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. The Treaty of Versailles blamed Germany for starting World War I, therefore making them liable to pay the reparation payments which totalled 132,000 million gold marks. ...read more.

Middle

The people on fixed incomes they were affected most by inflation because whilst prices for goods rose their income was unable to compete with the rising prices. This resulted in many German people being left hungry because they were unable to buy food. This reinforced their hostility to the new Weimar Government because the situation had been worsened as a result of the Treaty of Versailles. As a result of the Treaty an allied blockade was set up on areas of the Rhineland including the west bank, this resulted in the shortage of essential goods, again reinforcing the German people?s hostility to the new Weimar Regime. Therefore the onset of the economic malaise was detrimental for the new democratic regime because they came into power at a time when Germany needed economic solutions. Although we have to recognise that the cost of war was a main contributory factor towards the economic malaise because taxes had to be raised in order to cover the cost of war, therefore the burden of World War I was an underlying reason for the problematic start for the new democratic regime contributing to an unpromising survival for the regime. ...read more.

Conclusion

Edbert called upon the Freikorps to crush the communist rising, thus the socialist government was undermined because of its over reliance on the military to suppress the rising. And there was a lasting bitterness between the socialists and the communists that the Weimar Regime would have to address. Therefore Edbert?s exaggeration of the dangers of a Soviet-style revolution, leading him to over rely on the military to suppress the opposition did contribute to the eventual failure of the Weimar Regime. Therefore it can be argued that the Weimar Regime was born out of revolution, so from its birth it was doomed to fail. In essence the survival prospects of the Weimar Regime were significantly hindered because of the onset of the economic malaise and the structure of the new Weimar Republic in that its structure of proportional representation failed to compromise on a policy that could have stabilised the economy. However, to a certain extent, I would argue that the burden of World War I undermined the Weimar Regime as it was blamed for the Treaty of Versailles which undoubtedly harvested opposition for the Weimar Regime from its birth because people distrusted the regime. ...read more.

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