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I disagree that the decision made by the Supreme Court in the Brown v. Board of Education was a positive development for African-Americans to a large extent.

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Introduction

I disagree that the decision made by the Supreme Court in the Brown v. Board of Education was a positive development for African-Americans to a large extent. The decision made by the Supreme Court was a positive development for African-Americans for a couple of reasons. Firstly, the Brown Decision had resulted in a positive development for the Blacks in terms of social development and impacts. The Brown Decision was seen as very symbolic to the blacks. For the first time, the National Association for The Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP) had won a case that struck at the heart of segregation. The Supreme Court, under the new leadership of Earl Warren, had shown it was sympathetic to the civil rights cause. The blacks thus see this as a real turning point in the civil rights struggle. As a result, black campaigners started to strongly believe that the Supreme Court would back legal challenges in other segregated areas of life too. ...read more.

Middle

Hence, with them now having an equal and not inferior education (as compared to the whites), both the blacks and the whites can now cope and compete with one another on an equal footing. By doing so, the blacks will be able to improve their social and economic positions in the society. Therefore, the Brown decision was a positive development for African-Americans as it provided them with an opportunity to raise their social and economic status in society. However, the decision made by the Supreme Court was also a negative development for African-Americans for certain reasons. The Brown decision had resulted in a negative development in terms of political impact. There was an extensive white backlash that came after the Brown decision was made. Southern racists saw the significance of the Brown case and this led to the setting up of White Citizens? Councils (by the middle class whites) so as to demand that segregation continue in local school. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, the Brown decision was a negative development for African-Americans as with the rise of the white political backlash, the blacks fight against racial equality was now adversely influenced. In conclusion, I disagree that the decision made by the Supreme Court was a positive development for African-Americans to a large extent. This is because although there were social and economic improvements for the blacks, yet, in terms of political impacts, the blacks still do not have an overall say in their rights and thus their voices are still not heard and welfare not taken into massive consideration. The main improvement for the blacks was only in education whereas other parts of their lives (e.g. racial prejudice by the whites and peace & security) had not improved and turned for the worst. As a whole, it is more of a negative impact for them as their lives are now in jeopardy (e.g. lynching) and rights not taken care of even more (corrupted and dissatisfied officials). ...read more.

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