• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Rosa Parks and her significance to the Civil Rights movement.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

THE ROSA PARKS AND HER SIGNIFICANCE TO THE AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT Rosa Parks born in 1913, growing up in Tuskegee, Alabama during black segregated times, Rosa Parks dreamed of freedom and equality for African Americans. Her works with the Montgomery Bus Boycott, NAACP trials, and her influence on the younger generation have earned her a prestige name "Mother of Civil Rights" the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955 proved one person can make a difference. Her childhood has been a frightening and many people influenced Rosa Parks during her childhood and taught her to stay strong one of these people was her mother. When she was eleven years old her mother put her in the Montgomery Industrial School for Girls. This school taught its student's self-worth, a philosophy that gave Rosa Parks the strength to overcome hard times. Rosa Parks' role in civil rights movement was a crucial one as it helped to change the African-Americans life. Rosa Park worked in the NAACP (National Association of the Advancement of Coloured People -1909) and she was a very significant within the Civil Rights movement. ...read more.

Middle

However the public buses were still segregated in the South. Rosa Park was the first of many who confronted the bus driver in 1943, it was raining and she boarded the bus from the front door and the driver forced her to depart the bus but as leaving the bus she half sat in a white seat at the front. As a result diver was angry and Rosa got off the bus and was left to walk in the rain. But on 1st December 1955, Rosa Parks' secretary for the NAACP sat in the 'coloureds only' section. Coincidentally the same bus driver, who had thrown her off the bus 13 years earlier, James F. Blake, was driving the bus. As the bus got busier, a white man asked her for her seat and she refused, therefore breaking the law. She was arrested and fined $10. However, her friends organised a bus boycott until the bus company agreed to seat all passengers on a 'first come, first serve' bases. Black customers made up 75% of the Company's' business, so the boycott was very damaging. ...read more.

Conclusion

In November 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that busses segregation was illegal and in December, the company gave in. Black Americans had won a famous victory. Rosa Parks's refusal to give her seat helped significantly towards busses segregation becoming illegal after 381 days. Rosa Parks had the courage and bravery to take action she has been presented with numerous awards for her contribution in building positive change in a time when social inequality. Rosa had a capability for doing this effectively, but quietly and was known for her saying, "Do what is right". As Parks got older she still worked hard to make sure that she would see the day when African Americans got the rights they deserved. Parks knew the best way to keep the fight going was to inspire the younger generation and also have them join in. In February 1987 she founded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development. Rosa had work really hard in the NAACP and her institute has inspired young activist. Her role in the civil right movement has been really significant as she had influenced many other African Americans to stand up for what is right. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent were Malcolm X and the subsequent Black Power Movement the 'Evil ...

    4 star(s)

    Like Malcolm X before them, groups within the BPM aimed at improving the conditions in the ghettos. Striking figures of black illiteracy - only 32% of black pupils in the ghetto finished high school - and high rates of unemployment - in the early 1960s, 46% of those unemployed were

  2. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    the same jobs just as well as one another, and it was intended to provide African American families with the means to live in the same way as their fellow whites. It was declared constitutional too, by the Supreme Court in 1971, and their support of the plan begins to

  1. Describe the impact of the montgomery bus boycott

    Black civil rights groups also gained, NAACP received money from northern sponsorships and donations; people in the north saw the boycott, and had their attention drawn to not only the unfairness of the system but to the fact that black people were willing to stand up for their rights, as

  2. Linguistic Study - Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream', and ...

    Sentence Structure Simple, short sentences are evident in some parts of speech. "We cannot walk alone." "We cannot turn back." The use of short sentences creates a sense of urgency and makes the phrases more memorable. The verb 'cannot' and the repetition in these sentences are reminiscent of Lincoln speech: "...We cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow..."

  1. Futuristic Story.

    When we arrive there is a big queue, this is due to the annual free upgrades promoted buy schools, for any Robot to get a free brand new body suit if you achieve what's known as an I.A.F.R.D.H.C which stands for 'Intergalactic Achievement For Robots Driving Hover Cars' which is the equivalent of a driving licence, to the common folk.

  2. How far was Martin Luther King's leadership responsible for the gains made by the ...

    for the movement, the Presidents may also not have supported the movement and therefore we cannot come to the conclusion that the presidents had played the most important role in regards to the gains made by the movement as a whole.

  1. What was the short term impact of the Montgomery Bus Boycott 1955-1957?

    women at that time and just proves that after fighting for thirteen months they were able to succeed in their first victory in civil right which would have allowed them to gain momentum, and carry on fighting until all their rights were achieved.

  2. What was the short term significance of Malcolm X?

    This immediately created a common ground where all American's can share their differences and focus on uniting, so this again impacted on developing social integration and self-respect which was necessary for the progression of black people. In addition to that as a result of the internationalisation of the movement black

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work