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Rugby - I will be analysing the position of outside centre (positioned in the backs) and the demonstrator who I will be looking at will be Johnny Mulholland.

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Introduction

GCSE PE Coursework Section 1 - What sport/activity will I look at? The sport that I will be looking at will be rugby and I will be analysing the position of outside centre (positioned in the backs) and the demonstrator who I will be looking at will be Johnny Mulholland. Johnny will perform a variety of different tasks depending on his strengths are weaknesses. Section 2 - Skills, tactics and fitness components needed in the sport/activity. a) Five of the most important skills for an outside centre are: * Tackling is needed by an outside centre in rugby because a player in this position needs to break down the opposing sides attack to try and gain possession of the ball and also to prevent a try from being scored. * Side stepping is needed by an outside centre in rugby because a player in this position needs to be able to be able to move past any challenging players whilst attacking with the ball. * Kicking is needed by an outside centre in rugby because when a player in this position is backed into deep into there own half they need to be able to clear the ball quickly and accurately. * Passing is needed by an outside centre in rugby because a player in this position needs so they can offload the ball when approached by an opposing player. ...read more.

Middle

Also because if he or she is unable to run at a reasonable speed you will be unable to keep up with the game. This is where fast twitch muscle fibres come in. There are two types of fast twitch muscle fibres, Type II A and II B (Type I = Slow Twitch.) Type II A, also called fast twitch or fast oxidative fibres, contain very large amounts of myoglobin, very many mitochondria and very many blood capillaries. Type II A fibres are red, have a very high capacity for generating ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) by oxidative metabolic processes, split ATP at a very rapid rate, have a fast contraction velocity and are resistant to fatigue. Such fibres are infrequently found in humans. The second fast twitch muscle fibre, Type II B are also called fast twitch or fast glycolytic fibres, contain a low content of myoglobin, relatively few mitochondria, relatively few blood capillaries and large amounts glycogen. Type II B fibres are white, geared to generate ATP by anaerobic metabolic processes, not able to supply skeletal muscle fibres continuously with sufficient ATP, fatigue easily, split ATP at a fast rate and have a fast contraction velocity. Such fibres are found in large numbers in the muscles of the arms. * Strength is needed by an outside centre in rugby because if a player is running towards them an outside centre needs to be able to have the strength needed to stop or take the player down to the ground. ...read more.

Conclusion

An outside centre will use these muscles to support muscles in the shoulder and neck such the Trapezius, Deltoids and the Rotator Cuffs. Quadriceps Lower Four muscles along the front of the thigh. An outside centre will use these muscles to support the legs when making a tackle so that they do not get knocked back by the opposing player. Calves (Soleus and Gastonemius) Lower Two muscles at the back of the leg An outside centre will use these muscles to help to support the leg when they are tackling an attacking player around the chest. Hamstring Lower three muscles, semitendinosus biceps - femoris and semimembranosus that run down the back of your upper thigh. An outside centre will use these muscles to provide flexion at the knee joint so that when making a tackle they are able to get down low. Major Muscles in the body: Front: Rotator Cuff Deltoid (delts) Pectorals (pecs) Biceps External Obliques (waist) Quadriceps (quads) Tibialis Anterior (shins) Internal Obliques (waist) Adductors (inner thighs) Back: Deltoid (delts) Rhomboids Erector Spinae (lower back) Hamstrings (hams) Trapezius (traps) Triceps Latissimus Dorsi (lats) Forearm Gluteus Medius (outer thigh) Gluteus Maximus (glutes) Gastonemius (calves) Soleus (calves) * Agility is needed by an outside centre in rugby because when attacking they need to be able to move around defending players without being tackled. Agility is the ability to change directions at speed. ?? ?? ?? ?? GCSE PE 1 Jack Salmon ...read more.

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