• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The European Union will be enlarged from 15 to 25 member countries. Another two might join in 2007. Should this be the end of enlargement?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The European Union will be enlarged from 15 to 25 member countries. Another two might join in 2007. Should this be the end of enlargement? Elvira Gubayeva The European Union has been growing in size ever since its creation after the Second World War. It began as a post-war initiative between six countries pooling control over coal and steel to guarantee a more peaceful future for Europe. It now includes 15 member countries( Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom), has its own currency and has a lot of political power in global affairs. Plans have been made for a further enlargement of the Union to 25 member countries (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia), while negotiations are continuing about the accession of Bulgaria and Romania. Although there are many people who argue for further enlargement, stating that this would increase stability in Europe, others argue that this should be the end of enlargement, mainly due to the disastrous economic consequences that further enlargement could bring about. ...read more.

Middle

As well as that, the enlarged European Union would become stronger in its fight against crime and illegal immigration as there would be greater aid from new member countries. As far as politics are concerned, further enlargement could strengthen its role in foreign affairs, security policy, trade policy and other fields of global governance. Having said that, there are also disadvantages to further enlargement. Firstly, the accession of new member countries would increase the budgetary contributions of existing countries. This would be used to stabilise the economies of future member countries to fit to European Union standards. The great majority of countries likely to be brought into the EU by enlargement are below the poverty level. For example, Poland has a GDP per head that is less than half of the current European Union average. Secondly, there is a possibility of what is called social dumping. This means that workers from poorer accession countries would migrate to the West in search of employment.Unemployment in accession countries and countries wanting to join the European Union is already higher than the unemployment rate in countries which are part of the European Union. ...read more.

Conclusion

The cultures of different countries would mix, thus dissolving each country's own culture. Overall, although there are many advantages to further enlargement, the possible consequences that this enlargement could bring outweigh them. The larger the Union becomes, the less power it will have as there would be such a great number of factors that would need to be adressed, such as financial aid. Negotiations would be slow and ineffective as more member countries would provoke more disagreements. The enlargement would have a particularly negative effect on existing member countries, who would have to increase their taxations in order to help new member countries. Citizens should also be put into account and from a recent survey conducted in the United Kingdom, a member country, most people are negative in their responses whether the European Union should be further enlarged. Many people argue that Europe would lose its identity if its culture becomes so intermixed with other cultures. Therefore, the European Union should think very carefully about enlargement and its consequences in order to avoid it becoming ineffective as a system. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level European Union section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level European Union essays

  1. Why are developing countries unhappy with the global arrangements under the Bretton Woods system?

    decide whether or not the country is eligible for financial assistance (Elliot, 2003:123). The first stage in this process is known as the 'decision point' and involves a wide scale analysis of the country in question and aid is only provided if said country adheres to the conditions prescribed by the organisation (Elliot, 2003:123).

  2. European Union

    In a number of cases the ECJ has held that a Directive can have direct effect. In Marshall v Southampton Area Health Authority14 where a woman was required to retire at 62 when men doing the same job did not have to retire until 65.

  1. To what extent was the fall of Olivares due to the Union of Arms?The ...

    revolt precipitated the fall of Olivares and contributed to the collapse of Spain's military hegemony."17 Olivares attempted to make further reforms to domestic life but it only resulted in further disaster and disappointment. He suggested making a new silver coinage18 to solve Castile's inflation but debasement of the Vellon19 caused serious inflation and poverty became widespread.

  2. Transformation of the U.S. Hegemony in Europe through NATO after the Cold War

    Another important issue emerging from St.Malo for the U.S. policymakers was pushing further on the future capabilities of NATO. The issue of out-of-area was given serious consideration. The Balkans was the key region for the policy-making units, but NATO could extend to regions beyond. The issue of interoperability becomes another important item in the agenda for NATO since the different levels of technologies (such as communication)

  1. The Importance of the Cyprus Issue in terms of the Accomplishment of the ESDP

    Reunification talks started in 2002, but the June deadline passed without result. In March 11, 2003 UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan announced the end of efforts to reunite island and withdrawal of peace envoy. The Republic of Cyprus signed accession treaty with the EU in April 16, 2003 and the following

  2. What does citizenship mean in the European context?

    Would it not be more accurate, in relation to the Self today, to talk of DIFFERENTITY? Do not, pray, confuse what I am talking about with Multiculturalism. Whether in the USA or Hungary the labeling of people as black, or Whitemale, or Jew et cetera as a basis for group

  1. Economic and political integration between the member states of the European Union means that ...

    (References: table was created by me using the information in this web site http://europa.eu.int/comm/commissioners/index_en.htm) Pascal Lamy (trade) France 1 Michel Barnier (regional policy) France 1 Gunter Verheugen (enlargement) Germany 1 Michaele Schreyer (Budget) Germany 1 Mario Monti (competition) Italy 1 Romano Prodi (President)

  2. International Economics

    of national identity and maintain a degree of control over the national economy, while having the advantages of also using the Euro.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work