• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The European Union will be enlarged from 15 to 25 member countries. Another two might join in 2007. Should this be the end of enlargement?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The European Union will be enlarged from 15 to 25 member countries. Another two might join in 2007. Should this be the end of enlargement? Elvira Gubayeva The European Union has been growing in size ever since its creation after the Second World War. It began as a post-war initiative between six countries pooling control over coal and steel to guarantee a more peaceful future for Europe. It now includes 15 member countries( Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom), has its own currency and has a lot of political power in global affairs. Plans have been made for a further enlargement of the Union to 25 member countries (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia), while negotiations are continuing about the accession of Bulgaria and Romania. Although there are many people who argue for further enlargement, stating that this would increase stability in Europe, others argue that this should be the end of enlargement, mainly due to the disastrous economic consequences that further enlargement could bring about. ...read more.

Middle

As well as that, the enlarged European Union would become stronger in its fight against crime and illegal immigration as there would be greater aid from new member countries. As far as politics are concerned, further enlargement could strengthen its role in foreign affairs, security policy, trade policy and other fields of global governance. Having said that, there are also disadvantages to further enlargement. Firstly, the accession of new member countries would increase the budgetary contributions of existing countries. This would be used to stabilise the economies of future member countries to fit to European Union standards. The great majority of countries likely to be brought into the EU by enlargement are below the poverty level. For example, Poland has a GDP per head that is less than half of the current European Union average. Secondly, there is a possibility of what is called social dumping. This means that workers from poorer accession countries would migrate to the West in search of employment.Unemployment in accession countries and countries wanting to join the European Union is already higher than the unemployment rate in countries which are part of the European Union. ...read more.

Conclusion

The cultures of different countries would mix, thus dissolving each country's own culture. Overall, although there are many advantages to further enlargement, the possible consequences that this enlargement could bring outweigh them. The larger the Union becomes, the less power it will have as there would be such a great number of factors that would need to be adressed, such as financial aid. Negotiations would be slow and ineffective as more member countries would provoke more disagreements. The enlargement would have a particularly negative effect on existing member countries, who would have to increase their taxations in order to help new member countries. Citizens should also be put into account and from a recent survey conducted in the United Kingdom, a member country, most people are negative in their responses whether the European Union should be further enlarged. Many people argue that Europe would lose its identity if its culture becomes so intermixed with other cultures. Therefore, the European Union should think very carefully about enlargement and its consequences in order to avoid it becoming ineffective as a system. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level European Union section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level European Union essays

  1. "Critically Discuss the Prospective Economic and Political Impact of Turkish Accession to the European ...

    There is an urgent need for improvements in these sectors. At the time of Turkey's accession they have hopefully been made and with a stronger CAP and CFSP some of the negative arguments regarding Turkey will have improved. The main point to look at has to be if Turkey is

  2. Why are developing countries unhappy with the global arrangements under the Bretton Woods system?

    In order for countries to qualify for receiving aid they must adhere to the regulations that are imposed by MIGA, IFC and ICSID. The introduction of the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative (HIPC) in 1999 emphasizes the necessity for countries requiring aid to go through a process that will ultimately

  1. Transformation of the U.S. Hegemony in Europe through NATO after the Cold War

    European Caucus is related with the EU's decision-making process. How will the EU make decisions, since it is also represented in NATO? The fourth issue was defense production and trade. The U.S. saw the impending threat to their defense industry since the creation of ESDP would definitely contribute to the solidarity of the European defense industry.

  2. What does citizenship mean in the European context?

    This, then, is the other, collective side, of the citizenship coin. Demos, provides another way of expressing the link between citizenship and democracy. Democracy does not exist in a vacuum. It is premised on the existence of a polity with members -- the demos -- by whom and for whom democratic discourse with its many variants takes place.

  1. On balance, is the EU's enlargement likely to have a positive or negative effecton ...

    Even if recent estimations place the total cost of compliance for the ten Central and Eastern European Countries lower than initially estimated - between 79 and 110 billion euros instead of 120 billion euros the need for investment planning remains crucial.

  2. Examine the reasons for the different attitudes to European integration in Denmark, Finland, Norway ...

    Indeed, sentiment towards the Union has actually warmed since Sweden first voted to join in 1994. Asked to list the issues that had mattered most, the antis put the welfare state only fourth.

  1. The Institution of the European Union and Theories.

    *Common market, this involves the free movement of factors of production (land, labour, capital and enterprise) and the free movements of goods. The European Union is characterised by four freedoms: *The free movements of goods *The free movements of services *The free movement of people *The free movement of capital

  2. European Union

    need for 'integration yet pluralism, more and, at the same time, less centralisation, external homogeneity and internal heterogeneity, supremacy of EU law and principle of subsidiarity, economic development and social equality'5. There are many EU institutions involved in the European law making process which includes executive, legislative and judicial institutions.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work