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A Dolls House - Plot & Subplot.

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Introduction

A Dolls House - Plot & Subplot A Dolls house is a play from 19th century Norway about the awakening of a housewife from her unfulfilled life of domestic comfort. Living her life as if in a 'dolls house' Nora has been manipulated and controlled all her life by first her father and then her husband, yet she must think for herself and question all her beliefs when her marriage is put to the test, when her past comes back to haunt her. Having taken a loan to save her husbands life behind his back and forging her deceased fathers signature in the process, all her life is put at risk when the dishonest man she loaned the money from, Krogstad begins to blackmail her. The play opens on Christmas Eve with Nora just returning from Christmas shopping. ...read more.

Middle

Her mood is shattered when an angry Krogstad approaches her. Krogstad works at Torvalds bank and is the person who dealt with Noras loan. Krogstad has been found guilty of fraud and Torvald has decided to relieve him from his position at the bank. What is more the person to replace him, Mrs Linde is a friend of Noras and a former lover of Krogstad. This infuriates Krogstad, as Nora is the reason Mrs Linde got the job and he begins to blackmail her. This is the next key point in the play. Krogstad threatens Nora that if he loses his job, he will tell Torvald of the loan she took. Later Nora tries to persuade Torvald against laying Krogstad off, but is unsuccessful. Torvald tells her that Krogstads morally corrupt nature is too repulsive for him and there is no way he will work with him. ...read more.

Conclusion

He tells her that he will send her a card with a black cross on it when final symptoms of his illness begin. They continue in an intermit conversation and Nora begins to tease and flirt with Dr Rank. The conversation culminates with Dr Rank professing his love to Nora just before she intends to ask him for a favour. His words make her request impossible to ask now and the conversation dies down to safer grounds. Before they can finish Krogstad arrives. Krogstad now no longer wants to publicise Noras wrong doing but to blackmail Torvald instead so he can become assistant manager of the bank. Nora pleads against the association of her husband in the mater but Krogstad ignores her and proceeds to drop the letter in the letterbox anyway. Mrs Linde enters and realises what has happened. She goes off after Krogstad while Nora is left to deal with Torvald. She manages to persuade him to leave all his business until after the party. Oliver Jewell ...read more.

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