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Choose two poems in which the poets celebrate scenes. What is celebrated in each poem and how do the poets use form, structure and language to express what makes the place special

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Introduction

Michael Clafton 'Choose two poems in which the poets celebrate scenes. What is celebrated in each poem and how do the poets use form, structure and language to express what makes the place special.' The two poems I am going to look at are 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' and 'In Romney Marsh' in which both poets express their love of the place through the poem. We know that the poet wants to celebrate Romney Marsh because of the way the poet is written. The poet is written in the first person, which means that the poet is showing that he is talking from experience so as to give the reader a sense of reality. The sense of reality is also emphasised by the ballad being very similar to an almost circular journey, the end of the poem is a repetition of the beginning: 'The wire...' is repeated, and 'Pealed' and roared are repeated as well. John Davidson is expressing his love of Romney Marsh through rhyme, rhythm, sound, colour and language. ...read more.

Middle

and 'Pealing again, prolonged the roar.', the prolonged roar representing the choir and there is also a repetition of peal in line 14: 'waves pealed on the shore,' and a repetition of the 'prolonged roar...', which gives emphasis on the liveliness of the place and the repetition emphasises it even more. Davidson expresses the harmony between by using a repetition of shrill in line 23 so both technology and nature are doing the same thing, they are harmonised: 'Shrill blew the wind and shrill the wire,'. Davidson uses a very simple rhythm pattern in the poem 'In Romney Marsh': every second syllable is emphasised apart from in line 17 where it seems Davidson wanted to express an even greater emphasis of Romney Marshes' beautiful sunset: 'And roses filled Heaven's central gates.' The writer also has a very simple rhyme pattern (A, B, A, B, A, B etc). This pattern, along with the rhythm scheme, expresses how Davidson sees the whole place in unity. ...read more.

Conclusion

In line 2 he uses the word 'dull' with the word 'soul' which to most people would be very offensive so he uses colour to show that not many people would avert their eyes from such a marvellous scene. Wordsworth, like Davidson, creates a harmony between all things technological and natural. There is the 'ships, towers, domes, theatres, temples...' and the 'fields', 'sky', 'valley', 'rock' and 'hill'. Wordsworth also expresses a harmony in the poem by bringing himself into the poem and expressing how he felt a 'calm so deep,'. The emphasis of how great it is, is represented in lines 9 and 11, with the repetition of never in 'Never did...' and 'Ne'er saw I'. These both suggest that this is the most beautiful thin the poet has ever seen. As I have shown both poets use language of sound, language of colour, personification, rhyme and rhythm etc. These all come together to let the poet express and celebrate their chosen landscapes. ...read more.

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