• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast the odes we have studied to show the range of subjects covered

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and contrast the odes we have studied to show the range of subjects covered- Laura Evans, 10sa An ode is a form of lyric poetry where the poet reveals his personality. He shares his thoughts, feelings and opinions as we see through his eyes. I found, that the Keats' poems were written in a romantic style, being both very majestic and full of his imagination. In 'Ode to a Nightingale' as he cannot see the ground around him, he imagines it using his other senses. In 'Ode on a Grecian Urn', Keats imagines what the people on the urn were doing when the picture was painted. He reflects on the idea of a thing of beauty living on past his lifetime and he rejoices in the fact that the urn will never change. The people on the urn are frozen in a moment of time forever. This idea is mirrored in 'Ode to a Nightingale', since all nightingales sing the same song, he imagines the other people who have sat, like him and listened to the bird's song, using the idea that the song of the nightingale transcends time. ...read more.

Middle

He makes it seem like a friend, someone you can relate to: "Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun" The thing that separates 'To a Mouse' from the other four odes is that it is written in Scottish dialect; "A daimen icker in a thrave 'S a sma' request:" The use of dialect changes the mood the language can create because it is unfamiliar. The dialect is lifted from how the people of Scotland spoke at the time. This limits the possibility for creating grandeur and opulence because it allied it with the Scottish peasants. This poem is written in a conversational style making it much less formal and more 'common'. Because the poem is written as a conversation, it leaves little to the imagination or the senses. The structure of the stanzas is much simpler, with the simpler rhyme scheme. In Keats' 'To Autumn', some of the lines end with punctuation, whereas others continue from one line to the next. This is called enjambment and causes the sense of being dragged out, the passage of time. In the final stanza, he drags the lines out, not only by enjambment but also by the repetition of 'and' to join each line. ...read more.

Conclusion

This illustrates that a poem as well as having a range of subjects can also have a very different purpose. The theme of 'To Autumn' is to value everything for itself: "Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they? Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, -" In some ways, this sums up the morals of the other odes, in that with 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' and 'Ode to a Nightingale' Keats is suggesting that mortal beauty being transient should not be too highly valued. The moral for the 'Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat, Drowned in a Tub of Gold Fishes' is that: "Nor all, that glisters, gold." meaning that one should not judge things on their appearance. In 'To a Mouse' Robert Burns suggests that we should value things as we go because the future might not turn out as we expect: "In proving foresight may be vain: ... An' lea'e us nought but grief and pain, For promis'd joy." Although, at first these odes appear to have widely differing subjects and styles, and structures when studied more closely, it appears that they are connected by a variety of themes and common elements. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE John Keats section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE John Keats essays

  1. Compare and contrast Keats 'Ode of Autumn' with Heaney's 'Death of a Naturalist' bringing ...

    He uses these to give the poem different insights to look from and write from, establishing Heaney's unique style. Throughout the poem Heaney plays with the poetic techniques, changing metre, rhythm, alliteration, assonance and onomatopoeia. He does not, however use very many poetic words, preferring to use words that are close to speech.

  2. Compare and contrast William Wordsworth and John Keats' attitude towards nature in the poems ...

    He wonders whether he should "Stop here or gently pass". In the same way the wonderful experience of the sight of the daffodils was like an unexpected gift when he was wandering "Lonely as a cloud...Beside the lake". He had not expected to see anything unusual and it came as

  1. Compare and Contrast Keat's Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on a Grecian Urn and ...

    And, little town, thy streets for evermore will silent be." The fact that things cannot be experienced fully in the immortal world described in Ode to a Nightingale is also shown in Ode on a Grecian Urn. When Keat's describes a couple shown on the urn, they are frozen at

  2. Compare and contrast Keats' presentation of time, transience and mortality in "Ode to Autumn" ...

    Throughout these three poems Keats has been excessively trying to seek resolution and emotional fulfilment. Unfortunately he cannot find either in "Ode on a Grecian Urn" nor "Ode to a Nightingale" whereas he does in "Ode to Autumn". In "Ode to a Nightingale" Keats writes "Do I wake or sleep?"

  1. Compare the ways in which Keats addresses personal concerns in "Ode to a Nightingale ...

    of the nightingale being seen as a symbol of constancy: "thou was not born for death immortal bird! No hungry generations tread thee down". He also writes about the wonder of the nightingale's song and how it juxtaposes both worlds.

  2. `A thing of beauty is a joy forever` - How far and in what ...

    The punctuation emphasises the intonation. The pause after the `poppies` is symbolic as it arouses us and tempts us to smell and hence we are enticed by the drug. The pause after ` grannery floor`, reflects the carelessness mentioned and because it's a natural process to pause after sitting.

  1. The Ode is used as a poetic form for philosophical contemplation. Compare two ...

    Increasingly throughout the odes, I can see that John has indeed spent many thought provoking sessions in front of the artefact he describes. He sees, he feels, he waits and then he writes. The form of poetry which Keats was most celebrated for was the Ode.

  2. 'The ode is used as a poetic form for philosophical contemplation.' Compare two odes ...

    As he is dying, he sees that beauty in people is ephemeral, unlike the figures on the Urn whose beauty ?cannot fade? and the nightingale?s song which is so old it may have been heard by ?the sad heart of Ruth?, a biblical figure.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work