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In this assignment I am going to explain how effective Alan Bennett's monologues are as dramas.

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Introduction

GCSE "Talking Heads" Assignment In this assignment I am going to explain how effective Alan Bennett's monologues are as dramas. These plays are written for TV rather than theatre and are experimental for different styles of acting with more emphasis being placed on the single actors face. This is in order to show subtle changes in expressions hopefully giving the viewer a more clear insight into the characters feelings. This is more appropriate for "A Cream Cracker..." as it is a moving story, which is portrayed, even more so in the subtle movement of Doris's face "Cracked the photo. We're cracked, Wilfred." Doris has cracked her wedding photo to her late husband Wilfred, the sadness being emphasized not only through her voice but through facial expressions is far more effective. It also works well in "Her Big Chance" as the falseness of Leslie comes across through her trying to be professional and the false gestures and expressions she puts into doing this. "Are you on the cans because id like some direction on this point." Here Leslie is an extra on the daytime soap Crossroads and is asking for direction on the simplest of parts, in order to suggest that she is professional so that she might get a call back. ...read more.

Middle

Alan Bennett has used pathos here to show us how hard it is for old people to manage everyday things while living on their own. Leslie is likeable as she is humorous without meaning to be, she also tends to make a fool of herself towards the viewers and her co-workers. "I' not used to working like this" Leslie is comparing the provisions and the time she is left sitting around to a major film 'Tess', as far as we know this is the only major film she has worked on. She was an extra and named her single scene character with no lines, 'Chloe'. In these plays the actors are talking directly to the viewer but the viewer is not involved in the conversation instead is more like an eavesdropper on the actor who is talking to herself. This could be incorrect as there are several pauses in the story, which could be there for the audience to reply. This could be were the drama is involved, with the viewers ability to interact with the actor as such. The drama could also be with the single actor playing the parts of several characters as they recall what had happened and the conversations that they had involvement in. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Wilfred was always hankering after a dog." Wilfred is brought into the story at every opportunity. We also know she is unable to completely look after herself and needs home help which she is not entirely happy about. We know that Leslie is in her early 30's and lives on her own in a flat. We know she is a part time actress who would take almost any part that comes along. We know she is willing to learn various skills for particular parts and is extremely enthusiastic. "I'm very happy to learn both chess and water-skiing," We also know she is extremely gullible and na�ve "I am wedded to my small charges" Kenny 'the animal holder' makes Leslie believe he wouldn't sleep with her in order to get her to his room, to see a cat, by saying this. I thought the two dramas worked incredibly well and was surprised that I found them both enjoyable and interesting. It was a welcome change to see the dramas acted out this way as opposed to the conventional way of several actors playing out the occurrences. I found myself more emotionally involved as the emotions being acted out by the characters were clearer. As a compliment to Alan Bennett I would very much like to see the other two 'Talking Heads' plays. Martin Connolly ...read more.

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