• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Show how the respective codes of honour in 'The Battle of Maldon' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade can be compared and contrasted. What differences in verse-style account for the different effects of each poem?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Poetry Coursework Show how the respective codes of honour in 'The Battle of Maldon' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade can be compared and contrasted. What differences in verse-style account for the different effects of each poem? There are a number of rules of the code of honour that are shown in 'The Battle of Maldon' and they start off straight away. On the second line, the first rule is shown: "Then Byrthnoth ordered every warrior to dismount, drive off his horse and go forward into battle with faith in his skills and with bravery." This means that he is not going to give his men the chance to run away. Also, it means that they should never give in and always fight for their country. The last line says that every warrior should have faith in his skills and bravery. If you have faith in your skills then that is half way to bravery. The problem is that Byrthnoth is too brave for his own good and it makes him make a stupid decision. The main example of this is letting the Vikings across the river at the start. The writer does not praise this decision: 'Then Byrthnoth gave word that all his warriors should walk with their shields to the river bank.' The next important part is where Offa's young son sends his falcon away: "He sent his best falcon flying from his ...read more.

Middle

cowards beat a hasty retreat; The sons of Odda were the first to take flight; Godric fled from the battle, forsaking Byrthnoth.' Another rule in the code of honour is to keep on fighting even when you known you are beaten, even if your prince is dead. Also, during the fight, the warriors shouted to each other, encouraging themselves and others around them into fighting on for their lives and not to retreat like a coward: 'Now that our prince is slain, the earl on the earth, we must all incite one another to fight, for as long as we can wield our weapons, pierce with out spears, and lunge and parry with our swords.' In the other poem 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' there are not as many rules in the code of honour, probably because of its shorter length. In the first verse, there is a mention of a code of honour: "Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns! He said" This shows their readiness to accept an order, even if it is not the right one, and to carry it out without hesitation. In the next verse, there is a very good example of what the members of the Light Brigade have to live up to and to do if in a battle: "Their's not to make reply" They cannot argue with the leader but just do what is told. ...read more.

Conclusion

If there is something that the writer wants to get across but does not have enough room, he just carries on the line to the next. The first three verses all have a pause at the end of the fourth line, while the fourth verse doesn't: 'Charging an army, while all the world wondered:' The writer wants to get in the last bit so just runs on. Also in verse four, he runs on the lines a lot and this makes the verse a lot longer than the first three. This run on builds up to a point at the end of the verse: 'Cossack and Russian Reeled from the sabre-stroke Shattered and sundered.' There is a lot of alliteration in those three lines. This extra line suggests wonder. The reader expects a stop but the verse carries on to a greater height. This is similar to 'The Battle of Maldon' which also contains a lot of alliteration. At the end of this long verse, he repeats the word 'not' twice to emphasise that many people have died in this charge. The last verse is a lot shorter compared to all the others. He again repeats a whole line this time, but not from the same verse. He repeats the line 'All the world wondered.' He uses this line both before and after the attack and it compares the actions of the brigade. Tom Makey 11R ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE War Poetry essays

  1. Using the two poems, The Charge of the Light Brigade and the Destruction of ...

    and strown" the host represents the soldiers and they lie "wither'd and strown" suggesting they are dead and motionless. A comparison between the two is also given as they both personify death as images, as shown in the Charge of the Light Brigade, "Into the jaws of Death" and shown

  2. This essay will consist of a number of Interpretations some agreeing with the popular ...

    For the book to sell it has to be interesting so it may wash over some facts Even though this historian is British he does not seem to be biased, he can put the battle into perspective. He has all the facts available to him.

  1. Free essay

    The Charge Of The Light Brigade Compared to After Blenheim

    I also feel that the Poet is questioning the duty of the light brigade "Storm'd at with shot and shell, Boldly they rode and well," even though the they were being shelled they still rode on bravely. He also says "Not tho' the soldier knew Some one had blunder'd: Theirs

  2. The Charge of the Light Brigade Analysis

    'Reel'd from the sabre-stroke Shatter'd and sunder'd. Then they rode back, but not Not the six hundred.' The sibilant words produce the sound of swords slicing through bodies and serves to re-introduce the reader to the charge. Tennyson breaks his theme of repeating 'Rode the six hundred' at the end of each stanza to announce to us

  1. The Battle of Passchendaele (The Third Battle of Ypres)

    Unfortunately the weather had broken again. The ground turned into mud and most movement through it was difficult. The bombardments, by each side had now declined because the ground that each gun was planted on had become unstable. The battle of Poelcappelle was only a partial success with Gough's fifth army getting better results than Plumer's second army did.

  2. Why did Britain win the Battle of Britain?

    Productivity soared, and the repair units provided almost 60% of the planes used by the British in the battle. This allowed the RAF to equip all its operational fighter squadrons and at least keep in touch with meeting the mounting losses it would face.

  1. The popular myth of the Battle of Britain quickly emerged during the early part ...

    Churchill mentions these facts partly to be more popular, because by mentioning the people that helped in the Battle, in this way he is thanking them and they will like this. He maybe simply preserving his memoirs of the war for later references.

  2. Explore the similarities and differences between "The charge of the light brigade" and "The ...

    It updates the poem "The charge of the light brigade" to explain how the conditions they have to live in are appalling as they are now starving and forgotten as no one will spare change to the men behind this country.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work