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Show how the respective codes of honour in 'The Battle of Maldon' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade can be compared and contrasted. What differences in verse-style account for the different effects of each poem?

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Introduction

Poetry Coursework Show how the respective codes of honour in 'The Battle of Maldon' and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade can be compared and contrasted. What differences in verse-style account for the different effects of each poem? There are a number of rules of the code of honour that are shown in 'The Battle of Maldon' and they start off straight away. On the second line, the first rule is shown: "Then Byrthnoth ordered every warrior to dismount, drive off his horse and go forward into battle with faith in his skills and with bravery." This means that he is not going to give his men the chance to run away. Also, it means that they should never give in and always fight for their country. The last line says that every warrior should have faith in his skills and bravery. If you have faith in your skills then that is half way to bravery. The problem is that Byrthnoth is too brave for his own good and it makes him make a stupid decision. The main example of this is letting the Vikings across the river at the start. The writer does not praise this decision: 'Then Byrthnoth gave word that all his warriors should walk with their shields to the river bank.' The next important part is where Offa's young son sends his falcon away: "He sent his best falcon flying from his ...read more.

Middle

cowards beat a hasty retreat; The sons of Odda were the first to take flight; Godric fled from the battle, forsaking Byrthnoth.' Another rule in the code of honour is to keep on fighting even when you known you are beaten, even if your prince is dead. Also, during the fight, the warriors shouted to each other, encouraging themselves and others around them into fighting on for their lives and not to retreat like a coward: 'Now that our prince is slain, the earl on the earth, we must all incite one another to fight, for as long as we can wield our weapons, pierce with out spears, and lunge and parry with our swords.' In the other poem 'The Charge of the Light Brigade' there are not as many rules in the code of honour, probably because of its shorter length. In the first verse, there is a mention of a code of honour: "Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns! He said" This shows their readiness to accept an order, even if it is not the right one, and to carry it out without hesitation. In the next verse, there is a very good example of what the members of the Light Brigade have to live up to and to do if in a battle: "Their's not to make reply" They cannot argue with the leader but just do what is told. ...read more.

Conclusion

If there is something that the writer wants to get across but does not have enough room, he just carries on the line to the next. The first three verses all have a pause at the end of the fourth line, while the fourth verse doesn't: 'Charging an army, while all the world wondered:' The writer wants to get in the last bit so just runs on. Also in verse four, he runs on the lines a lot and this makes the verse a lot longer than the first three. This run on builds up to a point at the end of the verse: 'Cossack and Russian Reeled from the sabre-stroke Shattered and sundered.' There is a lot of alliteration in those three lines. This extra line suggests wonder. The reader expects a stop but the verse carries on to a greater height. This is similar to 'The Battle of Maldon' which also contains a lot of alliteration. At the end of this long verse, he repeats the word 'not' twice to emphasise that many people have died in this charge. The last verse is a lot shorter compared to all the others. He again repeats a whole line this time, but not from the same verse. He repeats the line 'All the world wondered.' He uses this line both before and after the attack and it compares the actions of the brigade. Tom Makey 11R ...read more.

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