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The Road Not Taken is one of the most well-known poems by American poet Robert Frost.

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Introduction

English Elective - poems and songs Journal entry 2 (poem) Kiki Hung F.5D (21) Eng set 6 (8) The Road Not Taken Robert Frost (1874-1963) Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I- I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. ...read more.

Middle

In the first and third stanza, sentences like "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood", "And both that morning equally lay" and "In leaves no step had trodden black" are the concrete examples of how imagery is used in the poem. The devices used allows me to depict the actual circumstance and visualize the dilemma the poet was facing, in which he was unable to take a pick of which way to go. In addition, from the line "because it was grassy and wanted wear" in the second stanza, the road, being an object, is described to have a desire. The use of personification provides the poem with a more vivid and lively cadence, as mentioned before. Moreover, the word "sigh" in stanza four, which is an adoption of onomatopoeia, emphasizes the traveler's depression and distress for the outcome of the decision he has made. In fact, after reading the poem over and over for several times, I discovered that the poet was symbolizing the road as the difficulties ahead of him, that he was confused and puzzled. ...read more.

Conclusion

I could not foresee my future but could only visualize my learning path behind a pair of blurred spectacles. "I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference." Incontrovertibly, there are many reasons for me to carry on my study in SPCC; but I believed that exposing myself in risks or new challenges does not necessarily equal to failure, and now see how I enjoy my busy but fruitful secondary school life now! :D I appreciate Robert Frost's poet writing skills, for he can imply profound meaning and lessons onto many negligible and trivial daily experiences, and he was professional in using specific matters to present some abstract ideas. Take this poem as an example: the poet used one of the million paths in the enormous forest as a metaphor for the decisions made in our life. Who can ever tell if your decision made is right or wrong? ...read more.

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