• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

UK Visitor attractions

Extracts from this document...


UK Visitor attractions Introduction UK tourists visit Attractions all year round, for example Alton Towers, The Tower of London etc. these attractions are known as visitor attractions. Visitor attractions over the last 3 years have been a big boost for UK tourism. Visitors travelling to various attractions always look at what's new as, we can see from the table that show most paid attractions in 2000. As the millennium dome opened it attracted 6,516,874 visitors that year. After this year the owners decided to close it down because it was only planned for the millennium year. The two tables on pages one and two show the most paid visitor attractions over 2000 and 2001. In 2000 the most paid visitor attraction was the millennium dome because this was the year that it was open on. It shows that the visitor attractions that open up on the same year tend to do well in attracting visitors. In 2001 the most paid visitor attraction was the London Eye. This was because it was a unique attraction, it allows visitors to see for miles over London. Visitors also take time to book the London Eye for special occasions, like booking weddings, for family bookings etc. The London Eye is located around various other attractions, Parliament, The Tower of London, plus it is located on the Themes, which makes it even more appealing because people that are visiting these attractions might take the time out to visit the London Eye as well. ...read more.


1,127,389 1,204,285 Chester Zoo Chester 1,060,433 1,118,000 Kew Gardens Richmond 989,352 860,340 Westminster Abbey London 986,354 1,241,876 Royal Academy of Arts London 910,276 760,800 London Zoo London 906,923 930,000 Windsor Castle Windsor 904, 164 1,126,508 Roman Baths Bath 864,989 932,566 St.Paul`s Cathedral London 837,894 937,025 Note: Excludes one attraction where operator did not authorise figures for publication. *Estimates Note: *Estimates In 2000 there were three theme parks and in this table for the most paid visitor attractions in 2001 there is only one theme park, which is Flamingo Land Theme Park & Zoo. This shows that theme parks are not popular any more as they hit there peak in the late 90's. There are now three major museums, which are Natural History Museum, Victoria & Albert Museum, Science Museum. These three attractions have gone up in the table in 2001, which has made them number 3, 5 and 6. Major Free Admission Attractions Attraction Location Visits 2001 Visits 2000 Blackpool Pleasure Beach Blackpool 6,500,000 6,800,000 National Gallery London 4,918,985* 4,897,690* British Museum London 4,800,938 5,466,246* Tate Modern London 3,551,885 3,873,887 Pleasureland Theme Park Southport 2,100,000* 2,100,000* Clacton Pier Clacton-on-Sea 1,750,000* 1,000,000* York Minster York 1,600,000* 1,750,000* Pleasure Beach Great Yarmouth 1,500,000* 1,500,000* National Portrait Gallery London 1,269,819 1,178,400 Poole Pottery Poole 1,063,499 1,129,419 Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum Glasgow 1,031,138* 1,003,169* Tate Britain London 1,011,716 1,204,147* Cannon Hill Park Moseley 950,000* 950,000* Chester Cathedral Chester 900,000 1,000,000* ...read more.


(http://www.surf-wax.co.uk/). Cliffs, The White Cliffs of Dover are internationally famous. The 'Gateway to the White Cliffs' visitor centre has spectacular views and introduces the visitor to five miles of coast and countryside through imaginative displays and interpretation. Much of the chalk down land along the cliff tops is an SSSI, AONB and Heritage Coast with interesting flora and fauna, and the visitor centre is an excellent place to watch the world's busiest shipping lanes. (http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/scripts/nthandbook.dll?ACTION-PROPERTY&PROPERTYID=382). A national park, Northumberland National Park is a remote National Park. The park is an historic landscape of unrivalled quality. Hadrian's Wall and its associated features form a World Heritage Site. In the Cheviot foothills and the Breamish Valley in particular, settlements and field systems from prehistoric through to medieval to modern times are superimposed, one upon another. (http://www.anpa.gov.uk/template_parks.asp?PageID=214&LanguageID=1). Rivers, The River Eden rises at the northern edge of North Yorkshire and flows north across east Cumbria to Carlisle and the Solway Firth, bordered by the Lake District fells to the west and the North Pennines to the east. It is a large and diverse river system, defined by the changes in geology from limestone and grit stone to sandstone. The catchments is predominantly agricultural with upland sheep farming giving way to beef and dairy on the fertile lower Eden valley. (http://www.first-contact.demon.co.uk/landscapes/eden.html) Usman Anne ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE William Blake section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE William Blake essays

  1. Was September 11 2001 a turning point in world history?

    the latter quote explains that, but yet it still goes on to highlight one of the darker outcomes. On Sunday September 30, 2001, Michael Burleigh, a Professor of History, had an article published in the Times newspaper. The headline read, 'the age of anxiety'.

  2. To what extent do major sporting events boost, local, regional and national economies?

    non-sporting public benefits, most notably economic and social development that enhance the life of the nation. Regionally Manchester will profit from the games to a great extent, the Lord Mayor of Manchester makes this apparent as he says 'The commonwealth games will be our showcase to the world, a great

  1. King (1990, page x) argues that

    the form of rapid suburban growth aided by improved infrastructure in and around London. The London County Council (LCC) took on numerous housing projects peaking at 16,000 units that gradually expanded outwards form the City and were facilitated by improvements in communications, a tramway system and the electrification of the railways.

  2. Analysis of 'The lake of Innisfree'

    'And live alone in the bee-loud glade' - this gives the idea of solitude, living alone but yet not that alone as he has got the bees buzzing. This gives a soft sound as if he wants company and is comparable to an old man with a radio.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work