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Original Fieldworld investigation on river Hyndburn Brook

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Introduction

This is the original geographical investigation conducted on Hyndburn Brook near Clayton-Le-Moors (source is at 73930), Great Harwood. Hyndburn Brook is a tributary of the River Calder. The following hypothesis will be investigated: 'Does Hyndburn Brook fit the Bradshaw Model.' The Bradshaw model is in figure 1. Map evidence for this research is attached within the coursework folder. Hyndburn Brook's source is at 30739, it starts with a NW trend until Fiddlers wood in Clayton De Moor. From there it continues in NE trend to River Calder, feeding into it at grid-reference 75533. Hyndburn Brook is a small river that is left unused by the locals. The following 3 locations will be investigated: 1- Near Dunkenburgh Park Hotel in Clayton Le Moors 2- In Fiddlers wood, Clayton Lee Moors 3- Next to Mill Lane in Great Harwood I will be investigating how the width and velocity changes from the source to where Hyndburn Brook meets River Calder. ...read more.

Middle

Methodology: On Saturday 21 March 2009, I have travelled with a friend from Blackburn Bus Station to Hyndburn Bus Station, walking to near Dunkenhalgh Park Hotel, where my first location was. Width - We stood at opposite sides of the river, holding out a tape-measure. We held the tape-measure 20 cm above the water to make sure that the reading would not be disturbed by the river's current. We swapped sides and repeated the method to ensure that readings were similar; if this is agreed on, the result was noted. We found that, as we moved to site 3, the river was much wider. Therefore, to ensure accuracy, we repeated the method four times, swapping sides two times and then taking a final average. Velocity - To measure the velocity we used two large branches (from the ground). These were mantled opposite to each other in a 'straight' line, 5cm in the first three sites and 10 cm in the third site. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that Hyndburn Brook fits the Bradshaw Model. Velocity - There is an overall increase of 0.8m/s in the velocity with most being gained between sites 2 and 3. This is could be because I have visited Hyndburn Brook on a sunny day (therefore no rain to bring storms), so the river in the upper-course was slowed down by the boulders (which acted as obstacles), this could account to why the river had only gained 0.2m/s in the first two sites. The river was also twisty (meandering) throughout the first two sites. At site 3 the velocity increases by 0.6m/s, 3* that between 1 and 2. This could be because the channel is now much wider, therefore smoother, and the rocks which were in the upper-course have been surpassed or have eroded away. Site 3 is also not as twisty as the previous two sites which may account to why the velocity there was faster. The results show that Hyndburn Brook fits the Bradshaw Model. ?? ?? ?? ?? Riyadh Abdulla 11J4 Original investigation (AQA B) GCSE Geography ...read more.

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