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Human Rights in Islam

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Introduction

A man named Ali once said: "May God have mercy upon the person who services a right and removes a wrong, or refutes an injustice and establishes justice" In this quote, Ali speaks of the rights of fellow Muslims, proving to us the importance of justice in Islam. Islam has outlined some universal fundamental rights for humanity as a whole, irrespective of whether they belong to the Islamic community or not. So to begin with, let us first understand what exactly is meant by human rights in Islam. When we speak of these rights, we speak of the rights that have been granted by none other than Allah. They are a part of the Islamic faith, and every person who claims himself to be a Muslim will have to recognize them. As for those who fail to enforce them, Allah says in the Holy Quran in Chapter Maideh Verse 44, "Those who do not judge by what God has sent down are the disbelievers." Now that we have understood what is meant by human rights, let us go into more detail about these rights. ...read more.

Middle

Why are there SO many people inflicted with all sorts of diseases, that in the west would be cured instantly with the available medical supplies, yet over there, are ignored? What has happened to these people and their rights? Why have these basic human rights been violated and trampled on? Has too much of our money been wasted on DKNY bags or Chanel perfumes to spare some for those more in need of it? Have we been paying too much attention to celebrity news, to notice what is happening to those less fortunate? Or have we just been too occupied with our studies and exams, which we obviously are so grateful for and have never complained about? Or maybe, just maybe, it is out of our selfishness that we are so blinded to the obvious. But if we begin to take notice, if we get up and make a move, we can make a difference, and we can begin to save lives. Giving charity all the time is a great thing to do, but is it enough? ...read more.

Conclusion

This verse shows us that those in need of our wealth, have every right to it, and we should willingly give it. The Prophet although not wealthy, used to always help those in need, yet we abandon our Islamic duties, and do nothing to help? The least that we can do today is to be grateful for what we have, and to appreciate the blessings Allah has given us...to appreciate that we have families, education, and that we have roofs on top of us. As for giving money to those that need it, Imam Ali says "do not feel ashamed for giving little, because refusal is smaller than that." However little you have to give, give it, because that is better than doing nothing at all. We are all equal, so why should one of us be deprived of rights that Allah has given us? Let us help establish justice, and bring peace to the world. Let us try and give back these people their rights. Let us help. Let us speak. Let us make the future a better place. Let us begin, today. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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