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Acceleration due to gravity lab

Extracts from this document...

Introduction




Acceleration Due to Gravity on a Ball at Various Height Levels






Introduction

This experiment includes dropping an object at various heights in order to determine acceleration due to gravity, and whether or not it varies with height. By using the distance the ball is dropped at, its initial velocity, and time it takes to drop, the gravitational pull on the object is found using the formula
d=v1t+ ½ g
2 .

Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to find acceleration due to gravity. This experiment is important to measure acceleration due to gravity and its affect on the motion of falling objects. It is also important because it helps to prove that although using two different heights, the acceleration due to gravity will remain the same. All objects have the same value of acceleration to the ground. If there is no air resistance, (objects are in a vacuum, or are on the moon, or are very heavy with little surface area) all objects reach the ground at the same time.[1] Even though "g" does vary at different positions on the earth, for the most part all falling objects have an acceleration of 9.81m/s2.[2]Therefore the purpose of this experiment is to find acceleration due to gravity and prove that despite the object, its mass, or the height it is dropped at, it’s acceleration will be 9.81m/s2.

Hypothesis:

...read more.

Middle

0.48531

0.3600

0.49616

0.672375

0.383719

0.51742

0.3780

0.53590

0.728474

0.418332

0.56090

0.3960

0.61350

0.776239

0.441347

0.61036

0.4140

0.64919

0.83797

0.466959

0.65137

0.4320

0.71995

0.918761

0.499422

0.71271

0.4500

0.76982

0.97486

0.537616

0.76076

0.4680

0.83349

1.030418

0.589512

0.81781

0.4860

0.91349

1.100023

0.62793

0.88048

0.5040

0.97525

1.19254

0.711699

0.95983

0.5220

1.03208

1.279505

0.742738

1.01811

0.5400

1.11702

1.367009

0.819351

1.10113

0.5580

1.20120

1.434914

0.895964

1.17736

0.5760

1.26599

1.529131

0.941233

1.24545

0.5940

1.35827

1.609462

1.036832

1.33485

0.6120

1.44332

1.690173

1.114563

1.41602

0.6300

1.55686

1.777137

1.191623

1.50854

0.6480

1.66103

1.895508

1.254983

1.60384

0.6660

1.76939

1.993738

1.34552

1.70288

0.6840

1.85444

2.109348

1.44864

1.80414

0.7020

1.93963

2.214351

1.512671

1.88888

0.7200

2.02469

2.323615

1.61109

1.98646

0.7380

2.13534

2.412766

1.67848

2.07553

0.7560

2.24467

2.544769

1.787332

2.19226

0.7740

2.37189

2.655886

1.876751

2.30151

0.7920

2.47834

2.774256

1.973021

2.40854

0.8100

2.61314

2.901812

2.07547

2.53014

0.8280

2.72655

3.039161

2.184322

2.65001

0.8460

2.88249

3.162518

2.280368

2.77513

0.8640

2.98894

3.294421

2.411249

2.89820

0.8820

3.12374

3.412251

2.517728

3.01791

0.9000

3.25842

3.536254

2.658372

3.15101

0.9180

3.38613

3.673143

2.761492

3.27359

0.9360

3.52789

3.821299

2.876523

3.40857

Table II: Position- Time Values for Height#2

Position(m)

Total Time (s)

 Trial 1

     Trial 2

 Trial 3

...read more.

Conclusion

2">2.877906

0.054

0.067227

0.043999

0.04958

5.371183

0.072

0.113445

0.083997

0.111555

10.31112

0.09

0.163866

0.135996

0.157003

15.23982

0.108

0.201681

0.171994

0.210715

19.49067

0.126

0.247899

0.223993

0.264427

24.55496

0.144

0.306723

0.283991

0.318138

30.31507

0.162

0.365546

0.343989

0.392508

36.74579

0.18

0.428571

0.395987

0.454483

42.64574

0.198

0.495798

0.463985

0.541248

50.0454

0.216

0.57563

0.531983

0.599092

56.91017

0.234

0.651261

0.61198

0.681725

64.8432

0.252

0.714286

0.683978

0.747832

71.54752

0.27

0.781513

0.751976

0.822202

78.53401

0.288

0.852941

0.815974

0.900703

85.66495

0.306

0.92437

0.903971

0.987468

93.87108

0.324

1.012605

0.983969

1.099023

103.1976

0.342

1.092437

1.071966

1.181657

111.5463

0.36

1.172269

1.171962

1.272553

120.5615

0.378

1.264706

1.25196

1.371713

129.6236

0.396

1.361345

1.351957

1.470873

139.4835

0.414

1.453782

1.455953

1.578297

149.6121

0.432

1.542017

1.543951

1.656798

158.1022

0.45

1.630252

1.631948

1.764222

167.5584

0.468

1.710084

1.723945

1.875777

177.0035

0.486

1.815126

1.815942

1.991464

187.4287

0.504

1.907563

1.915939

2.094755

197.2862

0.522

2.008403

2.027935

2.20631

208.0993

0.54

2.113445

2.135932

2.33026

219.3322


[1] Chesick, Elizebeth. “Acceleration Due to Gravity” http://www.haverford.edu/educ/knight-booklet/accelarator.htm (March 30th 2009)

[2] The Physics Classroom “Freefall and the Acceleration of Gravity”www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/1Dkin/u1l5b.cfm (March 30th 2009)

[3] Chesick, Elizebeth. “Acceleration Due to Gravity” http://www.haverford.edu/educ/knight-booklet/accelarator.htm (March 30th 2009)

...read more.

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