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The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications. To what extent would you agree with this claim?(TM)

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Introduction

1090-094 1 Nicole Swain Mr. Harvey Theory of Knowledge January 6, 2009 Word Count: 1220 '"The knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications." To what extent would you agree with this claim?' Knowledge is any justified true belief, as defined by Plato. There was a well defined line between knowledge and opinion. Knowledge is certain or proven by facts whereas opinion is not certain. All knowledge can be proven to some extent by facts. If it cannot be proven by facts, it is implied, according to Plato, that the information is an opinion. When knowledge is obtained, it is stored in the brain with its justifications. Samuel Johnson once said, "All knowledge is, of itself of some value." This quote shows how one values all knowledge in some way. When one discusses the value of a certain piece of knowledge, their interest in this piece of knowledge and its importance in their life plays an important role. One will investigate this topic further to decide if the knowledge we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications. ...read more.

Middle

The knowledge that one values more has strong justifications for it. That means that knowledge is back up by tons of factual data that leads to this conclusion. It can be represented by the idea that a car runs on gas. One can perform experiments and demonstrate that a car does indeed run on gas. It can also be proven that a human breathes to transport oxygen to the brain. It has been researched and can be proven through facts that a human breathes to move oxygen from the air to the brain. This shows how knowledge is proven by justifications. 1090-094 3 When one is grieving, one often does not want to admit the experience and accept the loss sometimes obtained, It can be from the loss of a loved one or the loss of a friend. We often ignore or push away these feelings. This causes us to deny the justification that the loved one has died. This shows us that sadness, in cases of denial, causes a lack of knowledge and justification. Knowledge causes happiness because of the intelligence level. ...read more.

Conclusion

Experiments have been run to prove different parts of science used to save peoples lives. Science provides justification of the work done by doctors and nurses. This can be found in text books and other medical reference books. This is highly valued by most people due to the desire to be healthy and live long lives. This helps show how knowledge that we value the most is the knowledge that we can provide the most justification for. In conclusion, one can assume that the knowledge that one values the most is the knowledge that one can provide the most justification for. It is very highly associated. One can see this through emotion, religion, relationship, and significance. All of these ideas agree with the conclusion that value and justification are not independent of eachother. This means that they affect the other's outcome. If one says that they are not independent of eachother, one can assume that they are highly associated. For these reasons, religion is thought to be untrue and full of opinions; nothing can be proven as true. The higher the excitement level, the higher the number of justifications for it. This idea helps prove that the knowledge we value the most is the knowledge for which we can provide the strongest justifications. ...read more.

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